5 Best USB Bitcoin Miners 2020 – Reviews & Buying Guide

Alienware Alpha R1 is 2020

Alienware Alpha R1 in 2020*

Mistyped the title...
This is going to be a simple guide to help any R1 owner upgrade and optimize their Alpha.

Upgradable Parts

(In order of importance)
Storage Unit:
HDD OUT
SSD IN
This is by far the easiest upgrade to make and the most effective.
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100011693%20600038463
Any of those will work, just needs to be 2.5 Inch SATA.
How to Replace Video

WIFI Card:
This is like a 5-15$ upgrade. Go find any Intel 7265ngw off eBay and replace it with your current WIFI card. If you don’t want to buy used then here.
How to Replace Video

RAM:
Ram prices have tanked because of bitcoin mining, so this has become quite a cheap upgrade as well. I’d recommend 16GB just because why not, but if your tight on cash 8GB is fine.
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100007609%20601190332%20601342186%20600000401&Order=BESTMATCH
How to Replace Video

CPU:
This required the most research. I’d recommend you look through this first. The wattage of the processor slot only ranges from 35w-50w according to a developer of the Alpha (Source). The socket type is LGA 1150.
If you’re going cheap, the i5-4590t (35w) and i5-4690s (65w) are both great options.
i5-4590t
i5-4690s
The i5-4690t (45w) is also great but is hard to find from a trustworthy source for a reasonable price.
If your willing to spend $100+ then easily the i7-4790t (45w). That is probably the best processor to put in the Alpha. All 45w will be used giving you 3.9 GHz Turbo. The T series apparently runs the best on the R1 according to This Reddit post.
How to Replace Video

GPU:
Coming Soon!

Maxed out Alpha R1 specs: i7-4790t, 1TB Samsung SSD, 16GB DDR3, Nvidia Geforce GTX 860m.
(Upgrading to anything better then that is pointless)

Optimizing the Alpha R1

Peripherals

submitted by Kidd-Valley to AlienwareAlpha [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

PCI-e to USB Card Passthrough Suggestions

My POS motherboard only has ONE usb controller, which means I'm unable to pass it through to my Windows gaming VM. I need to do this as my Xbox wireless adapter is really wonky with just USB passthrough, and the only way to get around this is to passthrough an entire USB controller. Pretty sure this is a KVM issue as I've never had any issues passing through USB devices on ESXi.
I have an mATX build with a huge graphics card, so my PCIe x2 slots are blocked off, but I managed to use one of those bitcoin mining rig extender cables to "breakout" the slot. My inelegant plan is to just get a PCIE to USB card and mount it externally.
Anyone have any suggestions for a good card that works with unRAID? I see a lot of cheap options on eBay/Amazon. Used server grade cards would be ideal.
I'm even open to alternate suggestions. Things I've thought about:
submitted by nphil to unRAID [link] [comments]

My Beginnings

Images: https://imgur.com/a/tOFNhlJ

My Current Rack Setup

So, this is the first time I've ever done a post like this to homelab and I wanted to give as much detail as possible.
For this, i'm going to work my way left to right, top to bottom.
submitted by DevelopedLogic to homelab [link] [comments]

Need some troubleshooting help! Riser 008s and R3c

This project isn't for gpu mining but I know these risers are mainly used for this purpose so I thought I might get some good feedback here. My project is that I have an itx board with a single x16 pcie slot. It also has 3 m.2 pcie gen3 x4 slots. I have one free m.2 slot and wanted to convert that to x16 via riser. I wanted a 2nd low power silent gpu added to the rig. I went with the fanless msi 1030. It has a max draw of ~30w so I figured sata power would be safe. I purchased this and this to test with. Neither work!! So it must be something on my end?? The first part is fairly standard, the difference being I'm going to a m.2 slot where most of you are coming from x1 or x4. "In theory" this should just work! I'll start with the 2nd part since it's very simple: m.2 connector -> x16 socket + sata power. I hooked this up, seated the gpu and booted up. Nothing. Not even bios. I pulled the gpu and booted. Bios worked and booted up (running a 1080ti direct on the board). Installed the gpu back and nothing. I bought the 1030 used so I pulled the 1080ti and installed the 1030 direct to the mb. Works! So then I thought maybe the riser is bad or that sata power is insufficient seeing that most gpus would also have 6+8pin direct whereas mine has no external power. So I swapped risers out. This time the 008s with additional power connectors. Exact same thing. First I powered via pci only. Then sata+pci. And finally sata+pci+molex. In all situations the red led lit up. In all situations if I do not have the gpu plugged in it boots up fine. The strange thing is I never get into bios. No speaker or post lcd on this board so my troubleshooting is limited. And to note I test both gpu hdmi ports just to make sure one vs the other was set to primary. I got lazy and just looked at my mouse to light up to see if it booted. The mouse stayed dark, implying it never posted. Any help would be greatly appreciated! solved I have two m.2. ports which are pcie only. I have 1 port that is pcie/sata. the suggestion by u/sqrtlurface was to use the pcie/sata port and now the 1030 is being recognized in both linux and windows.
submitted by iguanajm to gpumining [link] [comments]

Anyone have any experience with m.2 to x16 risers?

So first off, I'm a little disappointed that there aren't any april fools jokes here.....I have just come from homelab and well the top 15 posts are pictures of labs (the dog). perhaps a little excessive. lol.
I'm getting into virtualization (I'm testing clear linux + kvm) and have bought parts to add a second gpu to my itx build. itx builds for the most part only come with a single x16 slot. That is occupied by a 1080ti. This will be for passthru use. So from my learning it would be beneficial for me to have a 2nd gpu. The only expansion I have now is m.2. They are pcie gen 3 x4 based slots. Technically I should be able to convert to a x16 sized slot but run at x4 speed. For my use (2d only) this should be fine. Talking about this is making me research my card being compatible with x4. I believe all x16 cards are backwards compatible by design, but double checking. I am testing this and this so far without success. This application is primarily used in the crypto mining world so I asked for troubleshooting help there but was curious if any attempts here were made. p.s. my build is skylake-x which disappointingly doesn't come with igp and that would have solved my 2nd gpu issue. any itx owners with no igpu or need a 2nd/3rd gpu can try buying the above parts, but make sure you have a sata/pcie m.2 slot. for my system m.2 pcie only did NOT work properly.
submitted by iguanajm to virtualization [link] [comments]

I had like 3 friends ask me how to build a PC in the past week so I made this to help them.

(Reddit Edit: Help my improve the document with productive constructive comments on what I got wrong or messed up! Im only human lol
Also a lot of this is supposed to be kinda humorous. I didn't think I had to say that but, hey, its the internet.
I appreciate the positive and productive comments! )
Beginners basic guide to building your own PC as of early 2018
(EDIT: Sorry for being a MSI/Corsair Fanboy)
Heres a collection of thoughts to consider when building your own personal PC
As always Id personally use PCPartPicker.com to configure your parts and for further thoughts on compatibility.
First off building a computer is 100% based around what you plan to use the computer for.
Here are a few uses and generic ideas of what to go for. Audio Editing: Lots of small tasks that need to be completed quickly without lag. - Fast Processor( >4GHZ) - Fast RAM (MHZ) -At least 16 gigs! - Fast Storage, SSD manditorily - M.2 or PCI for best performance. - Shitty Graphics card, graphics card there only to keep the cpu from doing other tasks when working. - Can be a few generations or years old. - Many screens for lots of plug in windows to be open Video Editing: Lots of large to render and files to read. - Multi core processor the more the merrier - SSD for fast read/write of large video files. - Insane graphics card, AMD graphics cards are debatibly better but the nvidia Quadro series are specific for video rendering. Gaming: No more than 4 cores intense graphics card - 92% of games are not coded for more than 4 cores so why spend the extra money for it. - SSD for quick load screens - Nvidia cards, 10 series, the higher the number the better. Titan cards for MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE! Coding: quick processor for lots of small tasks. Ergonomic peripherials? - Dear god please dont use a mechanical keyboard so that your coworkers dont kill you. Home office: Everything can be a few gens behind so you can get the best power per dollar spent. - Sorry that Gateway doesnt exist anymore. I guess try Dell... 
Parts (Expensive Legos)
CPU (tells things to go places and outputs data) Basically three main routes to go for: Intel, AMD, or ASIC. Intel - Gaming, Data center, Hackintosh Pros: Cooler, Faster speed (GHZ), short small tasks faster Cons: $$$$, less cores AMD - Gaming, Personal Computing, Large task processing Pros: Lots of cores, better price per performance, faster processing of large tasks Cons: Hot chips, large chips?, compatibility issues with MacOS. ASIC - "Application-specific integrated circuit" Pros: Does the task that they are made to do insanely efficently, great for mining. Cons: Literally does nothing else. Holy hell these are expensive, very hot (fans will get loud) CPU Cooler (Im a big fan) Most come with an in box cooler that are ok but please buy aftermarket. In Box - the free shitty cooler that comes with the processor. Pros: Free. Cons: Ugly, makes chip run hot, hard to clean Air cooler - oldest type of cooler but new designs are highly efficent. Pros: Only cooler that has the possibility of being 100% quiet, most likely cheaper Cons: large, if cooler isnt large enough for the chips thermal output the fans will be loud. Liquid - Custom pipes are beautiful, AIO is easy to install and offers similare performance. Pros: Looks cool, great temperatures, "quiet" Cons: Water pump has possibility of being loud, possible spills Phase Change - uses the technology of refridgerators to cool the chip Pros: Can overclock until the chip breaks. (whats colder than cold? ICE COLD!) Cons: Loud (compressor noise), Large pipes, just why.... Motherboard (the convienacnce store of computer parts) Really just about what type of I/O you want. - MAKE SURE FORM FACTOR FITS YOUR CASE! (or vice versa) - Look for PCI lanes for expansion. - How many graphic cards do you have? - PCI based interfaces? - PCI SSD? - PCI DAC? - PCI WIFI? - USbs? Network? Audio? - How many lanes of RAM? - DOES IT FIT YOUR PROCESSOR!?! (really tho) - M.2? - How many sata interaces? Good Brands: MSI, ASUS, Gigabyte Bad Brands: AS(s)Rock, Dell Memory (Dory) - The more the merrier - No less than 8gb for a functional windows machine (16 gb to never have a problem) - Use all the lanes your computer has to offer! the more lanes to access the faster the data can travel! -Imagine drinking a milkshake. If the straw is wider you can drink more of the milkshake than a skinny straw. - Faster MHZ for faster data access but give minimal performance differances - Please get ram with heat spreadders unles youre building a server with high airflow. - Make sure the type (DDR3 or DDR4) of RAM matches what your processomotherboard call for. Good Brands: Corsair, G.Skill, Ballistix Storage (Grandpa that remembers everythign about how things used to be but takes forever to learn a new tasK) Speed or massive storage? slower is cheaper. Golden ratio of speed/storage/price is 250-500 gb SSD and a 1+ tb disk drive. *Max speeds listed are for a single drive not RAID* Hard Disk Drives (HDD) - Cheapest and slowest - read/write speeds of < 0.5gb/s - 7200+ RPM or GTFO - Higher Speed drives can access data faster. - Do not move while powered up. physical parts will break. - Larger Cahche = faster Read/Write Speeds Pros: Cheap, Holds massive amounts of data Cons: Slower than molasses in a frezer Reputible Brands: Seagate, WD Solid State Drives (SSD) - necessity for quick boots and fast load screens (can only be re-written to so many times) - SATA based (2.5 inch)- Read/Write speeds capped @ 6 gb/s Pros: Most economical, form factor fits with old computers, Cons: "Slow" compared to other ssd's (but stil 12 times faster than a HDD) - M.2 based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 10 gb/s Pros: Size of a sick of gum! High End but not too expensive to be out of reach. Cons: Expensive for any size over 500 gb - PCI based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 20 gb/s for PCI3, x4 Pros: HOLY BANDWIDTH BATMAN! Faster than that little creepy ghost thats always in the corner of you eye Cons: You might have to take out a loan to buy one. *takes up a x4 PCI Lane* Reputible Brands: Samsung! Corsair, Plextor, Intel, Kingston, Crucial Video Card (that one kid that has thick glasses and is really good at math) - A regular old PCI card that handles all of the video rendering and output for your computer. - ASIC PCI cards. - The PCBs and chips are patented by two main companies but the differances come from line up and varying manufacturer cooling devices. - The more memory the better -NVIDIA (Team Green) Great for gaming, has specific card series for intensive rendering. Lazy driver updates. - Gaming - 900 series - Cheap - Low performance - Can play any video game made befrore 2010 on max settings - 1000 (ten) series - Expensive (thanks bitcoin miners...) - Great for VR! - Video Rendering -Quadro Series - Gaming and Rendering - Titan X - Maxwell based chip same as 900 series cards - Titan XP - Pascal based chip same as 10 series cards -AMD (Team Red) Underdog does the same thing but slighly worse and cheaper. (except video rendering) - Gaming - RX 400 series - Cheap - Hot - RX 500 series - Cheap - Ok at VR and deacent gaming frame rates. - Not bad but not particularly great either. - Video Rendering - Fire Pro series - Gaming and Rendering - Vega series -Good luck finding one to buy lmao Case (Fancy clothing for your parts!) - Similar to human clothing you want it to do a few main things really well with compromises for each extreme. - Durability - Steel - Incredibly durable - Creates Farady cage for components - Heavy af - Magnets, just magnets.... - Rust over time - Aluminium - Light - East to bend for modding or "physical maintenance" - Less likely to rust - Huzzah for Farady cages! - Plastic - Just dont - no electrical Ground - no faraday cage - Light AF! - Breath (Airflow) - positive internal airflow! - larger fans push the same amount of air with less speed/noise - Looks - Window? - RGB - Cool Paint? - Fit all your parts - graphics card length/ clearacne - support for liquid cooling raiators? - How many spots for HDD/SSDs - Motherboard format - Cable management! Power Supply (FIGHT MILK) - Rule of thumb: BUy Powersupply that outputs 1.5 times the wattage that you need. - You can walk further than you can you can run. - The PSU can casually output 50-75% power for much longer than at 90-100% (without failure) - If you never demand enough wattage for it to get hot the fan doesnt have to turn on therefore making it quieter. - Modular means you can remove/replace the cables from the PSU. Reputible Brands: Corsair, EVGA Optical Drive (motorized cup holder) - You can download most things today so I'd suggest against it unless you really NEED to watch/write DVD's/CD's Operating System (software that makes everything work) Windows (Always Updates) - Compatible with just about everything - Easy to learn to code on! - POS inital browser - Likely to get virus's Linux (Penguins are cute) - Unique - takes less resources to run - Barebones - Incredibly personalizable! - Compatibility issues with just about everything MacOS (Linux but more annoying) - It is legal! - Great for art and your grandma that doenst know how to use computers! - User friendly - Compatibility issues with various hardware - Confusing/Limiting coding structure Peripherials (cables everywhere!) - Keyboard (higer Polling rate is better) - Mechanical (key is pressed at an exact stroke length every time - Mouse (Higher Polling rate is better) - more buttons = better? - DPI (Dots Per Inch) - In theory, if a mouse has 1600 DPI, then, if you move your mouse one inch (2.54 cm), the mouse cursor will move 1600 pixels - Higher DPI the faster your cursor is able to be moved. - Monitor - In theory the human eye cant see faster than 60 frames per second. - Keep in mind Pixel ratio! - 4k screen that is 22inches will have more pixels in a square inch than a 4k screen that is 28 inches. - Interface? - DVI (Analog) - thumbscrews..... - can do two monitors with one port! - support for 4k - VGA (Analog) - thumbscrews... - max resolution is 1440p - Display Port (digital) - nice button clip - supports 4k - HDMI (Digital) - 1.2 or higer supports 4k - DAC/Speakers/Headphones - Dont even get me started - Microphone - Dont get me started PT.2 Other (other) - UPS (uninterruptible power supply) Just a battery that allows your computer to have some time if the power ever goes out so that you have time to save your work. - Cable Organization materials! - Zipties - velcro - LED LIGHTING! - Manditory - Extra/Better fans - More pressure, less woosh - IFIXIT Pro Tech Toolkit - becasue who buys just one torx wrench. - Cute kitten mousepad - Yes, it has to be a cat. Dont argue 
This is a very general entry into building computers and what you should buy/look for. If you have any questions/comments send me an e-mail!
-Zac Holley-
submitted by Zac_Attack13 to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

A heads up to those wanting to use PCIe splitters/switches.

Well, after 129 miner restarts in SMOS I've finally gotten my 8 GPU rig mining stable for 16 hours straight. I'm using Supermicro boards in my operation to have IPMI and limit having to move rigs or monitors around to troubleshoot. Once the kinks are worked out its great! Anyways my board only has 7 PCIe slots so I've been experimenting with splitters to get me to 8 cards. Its been a long road. I started with a couple of those x1 into 4 USB cards which kinda worked if I was running less than 6 total GPUs and no more than 2 cards on each splitter. They are funky. I could run 4 on the board and 2 on the splitter for days but if I added 2 more to the board I had constant crashes. I spent an immense amount of time messing with the PCI gen, MCFG setting (base address for PCI devices) with mixed results. Finally as I gave up yesterday and put 2 cards back in another rig my x16 to 8 USB splitter finally arrived! I threw it in and hooked up 6 GPUs to it and I'll be damned it ran for 30 minutes no problem. I said screw it and grabbed 2 more cards again and had some rejected shares. Switched the slot back to PCI Gen2 and what do you know. Haven't had to reboot yet.
Obviously its known your mileage will vary using splitters like this. It won't magically make a 20 year old motherboard support more cards. But if you have a modern-ish board that doesn't have enough slots it may be the ticket. I know people have had luck with those 4 GPU splitters I'm still not sure why they were so unstable for me but hey this works. Only needing one x16 slot to run cards I may just opt for a dual CPU board and do some CPU mining as well if a new CPU only algorithm triumphs over Cryptonight.
x1 switch - https://www.amazon.com/LinkStyle-Extender-BitcoinLitecoin-Adapter-Ethereum/dp/B078YQMF7F/ref=sr_1_15?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1521395139&sr=1-15&keywords=x1+to+4+mining+riser
x16 switch - https://www.amazon.com/Motherboard-Express-Graphics-Adapter-Machine/dp/B07571T721
submitted by zhill29 to gpumining [link] [comments]

Need some m.2 to x16 pcie riser help

I finally made my way over to egpu and egpu.io. Read the DIY 101 and some of the initial tutorials over on io. I sort of risk a cross post because I also posted similar questions over on virtualization and gpumining. I started over on mining because they deal with lots of risers but in particular x1/x4 to x16. Virtualization because this is what I'm trying to accomplish and those of us who have itx boards all need a 2nd/3rd gpu. Thus far my testing hasn't gotten me anywhere so I'm reaching out for additional feedback. Summary I have an itx case/board running skylake-x (no igp). I need to install a 2nd gpu (4k 60fps/hz in 2d and fanless/silent were my reqs - I picked up a msi 1030). I have (3) m.2 pcie gen 3 x4 slots, one of which is dual sata/pcie. I picked up this and this to test with. Neither work. It appears that it's not even passing POST - no bios screen. After reading egpu.io and the diy 101 here my hunch is that I'm running into a bios whitelist issue. What do you think? Steps taken: 1. tried both parts, the one part only takes power via sata (the card tops off at 34w and sata is capable of 54w) and the other i powered via 6pin pcie. with a card inserted it does not even hit bios. with the card unplugged i boot fine. 2. verified that the 1030 operates fine by plugging into the single x16 slot direct on the board. verified that it is not conflicting with my 1080ti (direct on mb) by unplugging the ti and only running 1030 via riser. 3. verified that its not some weird sata/pcie incompatibility by disabling sata in the chipset section of bios. next steps 1. per a suggestion in the other post, I will try the dual use sata/pcie m.2 slot. I don't think the m.2 key would be sata, but worth a shot. 2. per egpu.io i will try to hot plug via the usb cable after boot. and see if the gpu will auto detect. personally i think this is what will do the trick. however long term this will not work because for my project the gpu is inside the case. for this reddit this is fine because most/all of you are running external and a disconnect is easy. 3. ironically one of the parts was on the recommended parts list over on io, so you would think i'm good to go. which really makes me think about the bios whitelisting issue. other than trying an amd card out (which won't meet my reqs longterm) i'm not sure how to fix/test the bios issue. I guess #2 will test it. Ideas?? solved I have two m.2. ports which are pcie only. I have 1 port that is pcie/sata. the suggestion by u/sqrtlurface was to use the pcie/sata port and now the 1030 is being recognized in both linux and windows.
submitted by iguanajm to eGPU [link] [comments]

Small form factor for home server and Bitcoin node

Before I start, let me emphasize on the fact that this request is something probably quite unusual for this sub and I apologize if it doesn't belong here. If that's the case, please let me know.

What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.
I'm looking for a small, quiet and affordable computer which will run 24/7 in my house. The aim is to make it a personal server and a Bitcoin node (not for mining, just a node).
A Bitcoin node should run on hardware with good endurance, stable internet connection, a large storage and that can run for a long period of time.

What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?
300€

When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.
Anytime during this summer.

What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc)
I'm not sure if it's the right place but here are my criteria:

Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?
France

If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.
I will use this computer as as server so via SSH after the install. I already own some spare monitors and peripherals.

Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?
No

Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)
As said earlier, I need a large storage for the Bitcoin node. I'm thinking about a 2TB NAS HDD so it can last for a very long time. The NAS variant of HDD is probably the one which suits my needs the most as the disk will be very frequently accessed and will run 24/7.

Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?
Mini ATX if possible. I'd prefer a small form factor. The most important part of the case is its protectiveness, the rest is not important.

Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?
No, I will install a linux distro.

Extra info or particulars:

I found the Odroid H2 and Odroid HC2 which fit my needs perfectly but they are either sold out, unavailable or have insanely high customs fees. Also I checked Intel NUCs but I'm not sure it is what I need, especially for the price. A Raspberry Pi is not a good choice because of the storage capabilities (connected by USB 2.0) and limited RAM.
I considered building a machine myself but I'm not sure which components to use, and where to buy them. This is why I came here and this is something I'm still open to, if the price is not too high.
submitted by ImAFlyingPancake to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

I had like 3 friends ask me how to build a PC in the past week so I made this to help them. Feel free to use or send me an e-mail if you want the txt file

(Reddit Edit: Help my improve the document with productive comments on what I got wrong or messed up! Im only human lol
Also a lot of this is supposed to be kinda humorous. I didn't think I had to say that but, hey, its the internet.
I appreciate the positive and productive comments! )
Beginners basic guide to building your own PC as of early 2018
(EDIT: Sorry for being a MSI/Corsair Fanboy)
Heres a collection of thoughts to consider when building your own personal PC
As always Id personally use PCPartPicker.com to configure your parts and for further thoughts on compatibility.
First off building a computer is 100% based around what you plan to use the computer for.
Here are a few uses and generic ideas of what to go for. Audio Editing: Lots of small tasks that need to be completed quickly without lag. - Fast Processor( >4GHZ) - Fast RAM (MHZ) -At least 16 gigs! - Fast Storage, SSD manditorily - M.2 or PCI for best performance. - Shitty Graphics card, graphics card there only to keep the cpu from doing other tasks when working. - Can be a few generations or years old. - Many screens for lots of plug in windows to be open Video Editing: Lots of large to render and files to read. - Multi core processor the more the merrier - SSD for fast read/write of large video files. - Insane graphics card, AMD graphics cards are debatibly better but the nvidia Quadro series are specific for video rendering. Gaming: No more than 4 cores intense graphics card - 92% of games are not coded for more than 4 cores so why spend the extra money for it. - SSD for quick load screens - Nvidia cards, 10 series, the higher the number the better. Titan cards for MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE! Coding: quick processor for lots of small tasks. Ergonomic peripherials? - Dear god please dont use a mechanical keyboard so that your coworkers dont kill you. Home office: Everything can be a few gens behind so you can get the best power per dollar spent. - Sorry that Gateway doesnt exist anymore. I guess try Dell... 
Parts (Expensive Legos)
CPU (tells things to go places and outputs data) Basically three main routes to go for: Intel, AMD, or ASIC. Intel - Gaming, Data center, Hackintosh Pros: Cooler, Faster speed (GHZ), short small tasks faster Cons: $$$$, less cores AMD - Gaming, Personal Computing, Large task processing Pros: Lots of cores, better price per performance, faster processing of large tasks Cons: Hot chips, large chips?, compatibility issues with MacOS. ASIC - "Application-specific integrated circuit" Pros: Does the task that they are made to do insanely efficently, great for mining. Cons: Literally does nothing else. Holy hell these are expensive, very hot (fans will get loud) CPU Cooler (Im a big fan) Most come with an in box cooler that are ok but please buy aftermarket. In Box - the free shitty cooler that comes with the processor. Pros: Free. Cons: Ugly, makes chip run hot, hard to clean Air cooler - oldest type of cooler but new designs are highly efficent. Pros: Only cooler that has the possibility of being 100% quiet, most likely cheaper Cons: large, if cooler isnt large enough for the chips thermal output the fans will be loud. Liquid - Custom pipes are beautiful, AIO is easy to install and offers similare performance. Pros: Looks cool, great temperatures, "quiet" Cons: Water pump has possibility of being loud, possible spills Phase Change - uses the technology of refridgerators to cool the chip Pros: Can overclock until the chip breaks. (whats colder than cold? ICE COLD!) Cons: Loud (compressor noise), Large pipes, just why.... Motherboard (the convienacnce store of computer parts) Really just about what type of I/O you want. - MAKE SURE FORM FACTOR FITS YOUR CASE! (or vice versa) - Look for PCI lanes for expansion. - How many graphic cards do you have? - PCI based interfaces? - PCI SSD? - PCI DAC? - PCI WIFI? - USbs? Network? Audio? - How many lanes of RAM? - DOES IT FIT YOUR PROCESSOR!?! (really tho) - M.2? - How many sata interaces? Good Brands: MSI, ASUS, Gigabyte Bad Brands: AS(s)Rock, Dell Memory (Dory) - The more the merrier - No less than 8gb for a functional windows machine (16 gb to never have a problem) - Use all the lanes your computer has to offer! the more lanes to access the faster the data can travel! -Imagine drinking a milkshake. If the straw is wider you can drink more of the milkshake than a skinny straw. - Faster MHZ for faster data access but give minimal performance differances - Please get ram with heat spreadders unles youre building a server with high airflow. - Make sure the type (DDR3 or DDR4) of RAM matches what your processomotherboard call for. Good Brands: Corsair, G.Skill, Ballistix Storage (Grandpa that remembers everythign about how things used to be but takes forever to learn a new tasK) Speed or massive storage? slower is cheaper. Golden ratio of speed/storage/price is 250-500 gb SSD and a 1+ tb disk drive. *Max speeds listed are for a single drive not RAID* Hard Disk Drives (HDD) - Cheapest and slowest - read/write speeds of < 0.5gb/s - 7200+ RPM or GTFO - Higher Speed drives can access data faster. - Do not move while powered up. physical parts will break. - Larger Cahche = faster Read/Write Speeds Pros: Cheap, Holds massive amounts of data Cons: Slower than molasses in a frezer Reputible Brands: Seagate, WD Solid State Drives (SSD) - necessity for quick boots and fast load screens (can only be re-written to so many times) - SATA based (2.5 inch)- Read/Write speeds capped @ 6 gb/s Pros: Most economical, form factor fits with old computers, Cons: "Slow" compared to other ssd's (but stil 12 times faster than a HDD) - M.2 based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 10 gb/s Pros: Size of a sick of gum! High End but not too expensive to be out of reach. Cons: Expensive for any size over 500 gb - PCI based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 20 gb/s for PCI3, x4 Pros: HOLY BANDWIDTH BATMAN! Faster than that little creepy ghost thats always in the corner of you eye Cons: You might have to take out a loan to buy one. *takes up a x4 PCI Lane* Reputible Brands: Samsung! Corsair, Plextor, Intel, Kingston, Crucial Video Card (that one kid that has thick glasses and is really good at math) - A regular old PCI card that handles all of the video rendering and output for your computer. - ASIC PCI cards. - The PCBs and chips are patented by two main companies but the differances come from line up and varying manufacturer cooling devices. - The more memory the better -NVIDIA (Team Green) Great for gaming, has specific card series for intensive rendering. Lazy driver updates. - Gaming - 900 series - Cheap - Low performance - Can play any video game made befrore 2010 on max settings - 1000 (ten) series - Expensive (thanks bitcoin miners...) - Great for VR! - Video Rendering -Quadro Series - Gaming and Rendering - Titan X - Maxwell based chip same as 900 series cards - Titan XP - Pascal based chip same as 10 series cards -AMD (Team Red) Underdog does the same thing but slighly worse and cheaper. (except video rendering) - Gaming - RX 400 series - Cheap - Hot - RX 500 series - Cheap - Ok at VR and deacent gaming frame rates. - Not bad but not particularly great either. - Video Rendering - Fire Pro series - Gaming and Rendering - Vega series -Good luck finding one to buy lmao Case (Fancy clothing for your parts!) - Similar to human clothing you want it to do a few main things really well with compromises for each extreme. - Durability - Steel - Incredibly durable - Creates Farady cage for components - Heavy af - Magnets, just magnets.... - Rust over time - Aluminium - Light - East to bend for modding or "physical maintenance" - Less likely to rust - Huzzah for Farady cages! - Plastic - Just dont - no electrical Ground - no faraday cage - Light AF! - Breath (Airflow) - positive internal airflow! - larger fans push the same amount of air with less speed/noise - Looks - Window? - RGB - Cool Paint? - Fit all your parts - graphics card length/ clearacne - support for liquid cooling raiators? - How many spots for HDD/SSDs - Motherboard format - Cable management! Power Supply (FIGHT MILK) - Rule of thumb: BUy Powersupply that outputs 1.5 times the wattage that you need. - You can walk further than you can you can run. - The PSU can casually output 50-75% power for much longer than at 90-100% (without failure) - If you never demand enough wattage for it to get hot the fan doesnt have to turn on therefore making it quieter. - Modular means you can remove/replace the cables from the PSU. Reputible Brands: Corsair, EVGA Optical Drive (motorized cup holder) - You can download most things today so I'd suggest against it unless you really NEED to watch/write DVD's/CD's Operating System (software that makes everything work) Windows (Always Updates) - Compatible with just about everything - Easy to learn to code on! - POS inital browser - Likely to get virus's Linux (Penguins are cute) - Unique - takes less resources to run - Barebones - Incredibly personalizable! - Compatibility issues with just about everything MacOS (Linux but more annoying) - It is legal! - Great for art and your grandma that doenst know how to use computers! - User friendly - Compatibility issues with various hardware - Confusing/Limiting coding structure Peripherials (cables everywhere!) - Keyboard (higer Polling rate is better) - Mechanical (key is pressed at an exact stroke length every time - Mouse (Higher Polling rate is better) - more buttons = better? - DPI (Dots Per Inch) - In theory, if a mouse has 1600 DPI, then, if you move your mouse one inch (2.54 cm), the mouse cursor will move 1600 pixels - Higher DPI the faster your cursor is able to be moved. - Monitor - In theory the human eye cant see faster than 60 frames per second. - Keep in mind Pixel ratio! - 4k screen that is 22inches will have more pixels in a square inch than a 4k screen that is 28 inches. - Interface? - DVI (Analog) - thumbscrews..... - can do two monitors with one port! - support for 4k - VGA (Analog) - thumbscrews... - max resolution is 1440p - Display Port (digital) - nice button clip - supports 4k - HDMI (Digital) - 1.2 or higer supports 4k - DAC/Speakers/Headphones - Dont even get me started - Microphone - Dont get me started PT.2 Other (other) - UPS (uninterruptible power supply) Just a battery that allows your computer to have some time if the power ever goes out so that you have time to save your work. - Cable Organization materials! - Zipties - velcro - LED LIGHTING! - Manditory - Extra/Better fans - More pressure, less woosh - IFIXIT Pro Tech Toolkit - becasue who buys just one torx wrench. - Cute kitten mousepad - Yes, it has to be a cat. Dont argue 
This is a very general entry into building computers and what you should buy/look for. If you have any questions/comments send me an e-mail!
-Zac Holley-
submitted by Zac_Attack13 to buildapc [link] [comments]

Small form factor for home server and Bitcoin node

Hello,

I'm looking for a small, quiet and affordable computer which will run 24/7 in my house. The aim is to make it a personal server and a Bitcoin node (not for mining, just a node). I found your community and thought it would be a good place to ask for some advice on what choices are available to me.

Here are my criteria:
- Decent CPU (I don't need something overly powerful but a snail is not desirable. I'd like something along the lines of a Raspberry Pi, or more, in terms of CPU power.)
- Support for any linux distro (By that I mean: "It can run linux". If there is some config to do I can do it. It will very likely be a 19.04 Ubuntu), no pre-installed OS.
- At least 2GB of RAM (Upgradablility would be a bonus. Buying the RAM separately and installing it myself is of course a possibility)
- Can use the hard drive of my choice (I will buy a 2TB NAS hard drive, 3.5 inches. 2.5 inches are ok too)
- Something quite quiet and which is not too hot when idle (which it will be most of the time)
- Low power if possible
- Because I want the thing to live for a long time, being able to install the OS on the HDD and not on an SD card
- A case protecting the internal components. I don't care if it's pretty or not, I just want it to be protective.
- Has Ethernet support (If it doesn't have wi-fi then it's perfect)
- I don't care about display output and graphical power, I won't install a desktop environment.
- Up to 300€ in total.

I found the Odroid H2 and Odroid HC2 which fit my needs perfectly but they are either sold out, unavailable or have insanely high customs fees. Also I checked Intel NUCs but I'm not sure it is what I need, especially for the price. A Raspberry Pi is not a good choice because of the storage capabilities (connected by USB 2.0) and limited RAM.
I considered building a machine myself but I'm not sure which components to use, and where to buy them. This is still something I'm open to, if the price is not too high.
submitted by ImAFlyingPancake to buildapc [link] [comments]

End-game tasks, more searching, resulting in more dynamic PVP.

I'd like to see some more end-game tasks that give end-game players a reason to loot and search around, instead of playing purely for PVP.
Examples:
Find 10 vaselines, 10 goldenstar balms, 10 augmentin pills. I don't remember the last time I searched a med bag as a PMC.
Find 50 Dbatteries, 50 AA batteries, 50 T plugs.
Find 100 screw nuts, 100 bolts. A reason to search jackets/tool boxes.
Collect 150 dog tags. This would force more end-game players to loot more for cash instead of purely making money from PVP like myself.
Bitcoin Mining: 1 x power supply, 1x power cord, 1 x CPU, 1x CPU Fan, 1 x circuit board, 1x USB adapter, 12 x RAM, 50 x Graphics cards. Saw this suggestion in the prelim patch notes, love it. Gives a reason to search computer.
Kill 300 scavs. I typically only shoot scavs if they are a threat, otherwise they are just intel. If I had to grind for 300 scav kills, it may be different.
Turn in 10 Forts, 10 Fast MTs.
All of these would be beneficial to new players as well. They would have more chances to creep up on players looting around, instead camping key locations, or running around looking for kills such as myself. These tasks would probably be better with a system where you can turn in as you go, instead of all at once.
submitted by RiseFridge to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Monero mining, the road to hell.

You know it started out innocent enough. One friend at work started talking innocently about Monero and before I knew it I had hooked the work PC up to Minergate and had started mining. After I day I saw Moneros slowly ticking in and felt that it needed to go faster, so I downloaded the client as well on my gaming PC at home, but I wasn't able to use the graphic card, the Moneros were still ticking in at a too slow rate.
I did some more reading and found out that Minergate was the devil, that the way to go about this was to set up my own wallet and mine using a client, directly toward a pool. First I created a web-wallet, but then I remember MtGox and all the trouble with bitcoins being lost, so I created a shell wallet on my file server at home and downloaded a few clients, compiled, compared, tuned and after a while I started to see some real Monero dripping in. I managed to get the NVidia miner up on my gaming rig with the juicy 980Ti card and that really made the difference, but I wanted more.
I work with grid solutions/high performance computing and at work we have a lab where I can basically set up whatever equipment that I want (within reason) and latch on to work's power grid. I decided to set up a dual GPU system and just leave it running in the lab area where we have the consoles and do general close proximity work to make things work in the real lab. I did not have a casing so I ordered everything I needed and after some troubleshooting (BIOS did not support the Kaby Lake CPU) I got things up and running on 2xRX480 cards, nicely hashing in on about 630H/s on each card.
In the mean time, to maximize my Monero flow I had turned every device, work and private into CPU and GPU miners, every clock tick squeezed for maximum utilization and at one point I even ran clients on useless Raspberry PIs, slow file servers and Beagle Bone Internet of Things cards, yielding no more than 3-6 H/s. It all added up, but I still needed more.
I started looking into building a real mining rig. I ordered an AMD Motherboard, more PSUs, CPU, RAM, USB risers, etc. and I got a rig frame flown in from China at a reasonable price. In the meantime I had already ordered another RX480 which were idling on my work desk while I was building the rig. The rig was being set up at my work desk, sitting next to my work PC which also was mining Monero at full capacity when I wasn't at work. GPU mining needs to be off if the system is to be used without severe graphics lag.
I had installed 2 GPU clients on my home system as well, one that really bogged down the system, rendering it unusable for anything except mining, the other setting I could easily do other work, web-browsing and such without too much lag from the graphic cards. Whenever I left for work or went to sleep I put the heavy load version on, and when I got home from work or woke up in the morning, my living room was warm and cozy, at least 4-5'C above the usual.
By now I had gathered 5 GPUs which had completely filled up my mining rig. Achievement unlocked! Although I still had some debugging work to do on it (random crashes) it still would run smoothly most of the time. The Monero is pouring in, about $10 USD worth of Monero each day, from both my rig and the myriad of fileservers, gaming and work PCs, and stupid little devices that were designed for completely different things. The value of Monero had increased from about $12 USD to $30 USD during this time, everything was with a promising outlook.
Then, yesterday it occurred to me, I did move 2 cards from the first PC that I bought, to the mining rig, which means that I could get two new cards and put into that one. So, I have just ordered myself two more RX480 (which by the way are much nicer for Monero mining than the RX580s) and as I am sitting here, having just ordered those cards, I am already planning the next step, moving the first motherboard out of the PC and latch it on to a rig and connect 2 more cards (it's a mATX motherboard with 4 PCI-e slots)
But now, I am wondering, where will this all end? Have I become a Monero mining addict? How many rigs and graphic cards do I need to finally feel satisfied? When do I get enough? And will this short term bankrupt me completely? Well, at least I am not using money on booze, drugs or hookers, but it still feels like an addiction.
Any words of advice or comfort appreciated...
submitted by bloodwire to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

The Concept of Bitcoin

The Concept of Bitcoin
https://preview.redd.it/5r9soz2ltq421.jpg?width=268&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6a89685f735b53ec1573eefe08c8646970de8124
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is an experimental system of transfer and verification of property based on a network of peer to peer without any central authority.
The initial application and the main innovation of the Bitcoin network is a system of digital currency decentralized unit of account is bitcoin.
Bitcoin works with software and a protocol that allows participants to issue bitcoins and manage transactions in a collective and automatic way. As a free Protocol (open source), it also allows interoperability of software and services that use it. As a currency bitcoin is both a medium of payment and a store of value.
Bitcoin is designed to self-regulate. The limited inflation of the Bitcoin system is distributed homogeneously by computing the network power, and will be limited to 21 million divisible units up to the eighth decimal place. The functioning of the Exchange is secured by a general organization that everyone can examine, because everything is public: the basic protocols, cryptographic algorithms, programs making them operational, the data of accounts and discussions of the developers.
The possession of bitcoins is materialized by a sequence of numbers and letters that make up a virtual key allowing the expenditure of bitcoins associated with him on the registry. A person may hold several key compiled in a 'Bitcoin Wallet ', 'Keychain' web, software or hardware which allows access to the network in order to make transactions. Key to check the balance in bitcoins and public keys to receive payments. It contains also (often encrypted way) the private key associated with the public key. These private keys must remain secret, because their owner can spend bitcoins associated with them on the register. All support (keyrings) agrees to maintain the sequence of symbols constituting your keychain: paper, USB, memory stick, etc. With appropriate software, you can manage your assets on your computer or your phone.
Bitcoin on an account, to either a holder of bitcoins in has given you, for example in Exchange for property, either go through an Exchange platform that converts conventional currencies in bitcoins, is earned by participating in the operations of collective control of the currency.
The sources of Bitcoin codes have been released under an open source license MIT which allows to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the software, subject to insert a copyright notice into all copies.
Bitcoin creator, Satoshi Nakamoto
What is the Mining of bitcoin?
Technical details :
During mining, your computer performs cryptographic hashes (two successive SHA256) on what is called a header block. For each new hash, mining software uses a different random number that called Nuncio. According to the content of the block and the nonce value typically used to express the current target. This number is called the difficulty of mining. The difficulty of mining is calculated by comparing how much it is difficult to generate a block compared to the first created block. This means that a difficulty of 70000 is 70000 times more effort that it took to Satoshi Nakamoto to generate the first block. Where mining was much slower and poorly optimized.
The difficulty changes each 2016 blocks. The network tries to assign the difficulty in such a way that global computing power takes exactly 14 days to generate 2016 blocks. That's why the difficulty increases along with the power of the network.
Material :
In the beginning, mining with a processor (CPU) was the only way to undermine bitcoins. (GPU) graphics cards have possibly replaced the CPU due to their nature, which allowed an increase between 50 x to 100 x in computing power by using less electricity by megahash compared to a CPU.
Although any modern GPU can be used to make the mining, the brand AMD GPU architecture has proved to be far superior to nVidia to undermine bitcoins and the ATI Radeon HD 5870 card was the most economical for a time.
For a more complete list of graphics cards and their performance, see Wiki Bitcoin: comparison of mining equipment
In the same way that transition CPU to GPU, the world of mining has evolved into the use of the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) as a mining platform. Although FPGAs did not offer an increase of 50 x to 100 x speed of calculation as the transition from CPU to GPU, they offered a better energy efficiency.
A typical HD/s 600 graphics card consumes about 400w of power, while a typical FPGA device can offer a rate of hash of 826 MH/s to 80w of power consumption, a gain of 5 x more calculations for the same energy power. Since energy efficiency is a key factor in the profitability of mining, it was an important step for the GPU to FPGA migration for many people.
The world of the mining of bitcoin is now migrating to the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). An ASIC is a chip designed specifically to accomplish a single task. Unlike FPGAs, an ASIC is unable to be reprogrammed for other tasks. An ASIC designed to undermine bitcoins cannot and will not do anything else than to undermine bitcoins.
The stiffness of an ASIC allows us to offer an increase of 100 x computing power while reducing power consumption compared to all other technologies. For example, a classic device to offer 60 GH/s (1 hashes equals 1000 Megahash. 1GH/s = 1000 Mh/s) while consuming 60w of electricity. Compared to the GPU, it is an increase in computing power of 100 x and a reduction of power consumption by a factor of 7.
Unlike the generations of technologies that have preceded the ASIC, ASIC is the "end of the line" when we talk about important technology change. The CPUs have been replaced by the GPUs, themselves replaced by FPGAs that were replaced by ASICs.
There is nothing that can replace the ASICs now or in the immediate future. There will be technological refinements in ASIC products, and improvements in energy efficiency, but nothing that may match increased from 50 x to 100 x the computing power or a 7 x reduction in power consumption compared with the previous technology.
Which means that the energy efficiency of an ASIC device is the only important factor of all product ASIC, since the estimated lifetime of an ASIC device is superior to the entire history of the mining of bitcoin. It is conceivable that a purchased ASIC device today is still in operation in two years if the unit still offers a profitable enough economic to keep power consumption. The profitability of mining is also determined by the value of bitcoin but in all cases, more a device has a good energy efficiency, it is profitable.
Software :
There are two ways to make mining: by yourself or as part of a team (a pool). If you are mining for yourself, you must install the Bitcoin software and configure it to JSON-RPC (see: run Bitcoin). The other option is to join a pool. There are multiple available pools. With a pool, the profit generated by any block generated by a member of the team is split between all members of the team. The advantage of joining a team is to increase the frequency and stability of earnings (this is called reduce the variance) but gains will be lower. In the end, you will earn the same amount with the two approaches. Undermine solo allows you to receive earnings huge but very infrequent, while miner with a pool can offer you small stable and steady gains.
Once you have your software configured or that you have joined a pool, the next step is to configure the mining software. The software the most populare for ASIC/FPGA/GPU currently is CGminer or a derivative designed specifically for FPGAS and ASICs, BFGMiner.
If you want a quick overview of mining without install any software, try Bitcoin Plus, a Bitcoin minor running in your browser with your CPU. It is not profitable to make serious mining, but it is a good demonstration of the principle of the mining team.
submitted by Josephbitcoin to u/Josephbitcoin [link] [comments]

Graphics Cards?

Hey,
So I've seen a lot of new articles about the price of graphics cards skyrocketing and they claim its because of the bitcoin boom. What I want to know is why any one would actually go out and purchase multiple graphics cards, when you could buy something like this https://www.ebay.com/itm/GekkoScience-2PAC-BM1384-USB-Bitcoin-SHA256-15GH-Mine352253438610?hash=item5203f0ea92:g:NyUAAOSw9OFZIDXt which is cheaper and more powerful for mining bitcoin. It just boggles my mind.
submitted by knil92 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Discussion] My own personal guide to used hardware alternatives.

Hi there. My name is Jeff. I've been building systems for the better part of 15 years and try my best to contribute here actively. After being involved in this little community for a few years now, I'm noticing a serious lack of discussion about buying used components, and I feel like it's time to shed a little light on the subject for those looking to build on a (seriously) tight budget.
As Linus said in his scrapyard wars video, buying new on $300 isn't practical, and if you posed the challenge to him on a random day, buying used is almost certainly the path he'd choose. As someone who's been "scrapyarding" as a hobby for the better part of 10 years, I figured I'd take some time to share some of what I've learned for the modern audience.
Let's begin with a simple rundown of modern "budget" choices, and I'll tell you what I'd do instead.
CPU
The G3258 and Athlon 860k are the sub-$100 CPUs of choice, and both work just fine. I have built with both in the past, and each carries their own set of advantages.
Used Alternatives: You can go in a couple of directions here; if you happen to have an LGA 1366 motherboard lying around, you can get an i7 920 or better for under $50, and they still hold up reasonably well. Being that LGA 1366 boards are not typically cheap when purchased used, my favourite option is the Phenom II x4 Black Edition series, each of which compare favourably to modern budget options, and will even overclock on some incredibly dated, dirt cheap AM2+ boards. In my experience, eBay prices on these get a little too high for my taste, but I've been able to nab several on Kijiji locally in Toronto for under $50 as well.
GPU
The R7 260x and GTX 750 ti are often cited as budget options for most builders, with the latter serving a very specific role in systems where power draw might be a concern. While there exists no option that can complete with the low consumption of the 750 ti (or even the single 6-pin connector goodness of the 260x), its performance can easily be matched (and exceeded) for less money.
Used Alternatives: The bitcoin mining craze from a few years back led to the Radeon 7950 and 7970 being blacklisted on the used market, and I think the fears about burned-out cards are a little overblown. Here in Toronto, you can easily grab a 7950 for the price of a 260x, but I don't pay anywhere near that for my builds. At most, a Windforce will cost me $125, as where I recently picked up some non-boost edition PowerColor versions for a mere $83 each (bought 3 for $250).
EDIT: Forgot to mention something important - avoid the reference 7950 and 7970. They were employed to a far greater degree in mining rigs because of their rear-only exhaust, and if you see a bunch of them from the same seller listed at once, they're likely old mining cards. Only pick them up if they're incredibly cheap.
Want to go even cheaper? The Radeon 6950 (with the shader unlock, preferably) or even the 6970 will rival the performance of the 260x, and shouldn't cost Canadians more than $50-$60. I personally have 2 in my possession right now, and have gone through at least a dozen in the last 6 months.
In general, one should always avoid Nvidia when buying used, because they are far too popular and overvalued for their performance as they age. I still see GTX 660s selling for $150, which is absolutely absurd.
Motherboards
Motherboards on the used market are weird, and this can largely be attributed to the fact that they're hard to transport and don't handle well over time. As such, people don't really sell boards on their own that often, and you'll likely have more luck finding a combo of some kind (or even a ready-to-go tin-can with no graphics card) for less per part than you will finding a given board on its own.
Used Alternatives: The boards I'd recommend depend entirely on the CPU you've chosen. Being that I'm a fan of the Phenom II x4 series, AM2+ boards are going to be dirt cheap, but DDR2 RAM is actually fucking expensive, so you'd likely be better off going with AM3. I've even seen some used AM3+ boards (The 970 ASRock Extreme3, in particular) for as low as $40, so it wouldn't hurt to look.
On the Intel side, you're actually at a significant disadvantage. Much like Nvidia cards, Intel boards (and CPUs) actually retain their value and don't often come cheap. For me, LGA 1156 is the price/performance sweet spot, granted I can find an i7 8XX to go with it. Even still, they're going to run you a fair bit more than an AMD board, and likely aren't worth it by comparison.
RAM
Ram is ram. DDR2 is pricy as fuck due to an obvious market shortage of the stuff, so the AM2+ board option might not be best by comparison. DDR3 ram, however, is ubiquitous, and I always die a little inside when people building on a "budget" choose to buy new at all. If I'm being honest, I can get DDR3 ram from e-waste recycling companies for as low as $10 per 4GB stick, at 1333MHz, and not once have I ever had a bad stick of the stuff. Even for people going the route of the G3258 (which only supports 1333MHz), this is the clear winner.
Is value RAM ugly as sin? Sure it is. It is just as good as that fancy Ripjaws shit you've got in your current build? You betcha.
Storage
Hard Drives are actually a tricky game, as they are the single most volatile component in any budget build, easily succumbing to wear and tear from age and daily use. As such (and some might find this hard to believe) I actively avoid HDDs when building value systems for people and opt for cheap SSDs instead. As always, check the date on a drive if you're really insistent on buying one, and considering how cheap a WD blue is new, don't pull the trigger on one unless it's for less than $30/TB.
SSDs are obviously (akin to RAM) highly resilient and are nearly guaranteed to work when purchased used. The average SSD pulled from an old laptop or an office off-lease desktop, will have no more than 100GB of writes on it, which leaves 99% of its life for you to exploit. While there exists no specific recommendation for which brand to buy, just be sure you're getting a relatively good drive with SATA III capability. 120/128GB variants of these sorts should cost you no more than $50 in my native Canada, and I've even gotten lucky on some larger sizes too. Recently I picked up 4 256GB Samsung 840 Pros for $75 each (I came), just days after I bought a Crucial MX100 of the same size for $85.
Monitors
Monitors are fun to buy, because the recent shifts in display technology have rendered a lot of recent-but-obsolete models nearly valueless. For example, remember when 16:10 was a thing? I actually still like 1680x1050 monitors, but the rest of the world seems to disagree, so I've been able to pick up 23" variants for as little as $40. Being that the slightly lower resolution actually eases the strain on your VRAM a bit, it's a nice fit for a lot of budget cards that might not have a full 2GB available, like some variants of the 6950. 1600x900 monitors are often just as cheap and come with the same inherent benefit of being obsolete despite being almost as good as its bigger 1080p cousin.
Keyboards and Mice
If you're on a budget, we can't even have this discussion. As much as I like mechanical keyboards and high-precision gaming mice, people building used $300 systems aren't going to allot any of their budget buying them. That said, wired USB keyboards and mice are virtually free (search your local goodwill or value village for some), and if you have to pay money, buy a wireless combo for $20 new from some little shit store in a suburb somewhere.
Cases
Cases on their own sell for about half of their original retail price, give or take based on the condition. I normally just get them as a part of a tin-can bundle and make use of them if they aren't too dirty, but when building for someone else, I'd often just prefer to buy a new budget case in the $40 range.
PSUs
I saved this topic for last, because it's by far the most difficult category to master. First off, you really need to do your research and understand how PSUs work before delving into these guys, as the cost associated is almost entirely dependent on how resilient the underlying platform has been proven to be. Generally speaking, reading reviews on JonnyGuru and HardOCP is a great start, but none of them account for units that are several years old.
As a general rule of thumb, I use the EVGA 500W W1 as a reference point, and build my value tree around that. In other words, if a new EVGA 500W (a passable, proven budget unit) is cheaper than a used 500W variant of a better brand, why would I bother buying used? Sure, that 520W Seasonic S12II puts the EVGA to shame in terms of voltage regulation and ripple suppression, but can I really make the same claims of a unit that's 5 years into its life? Wouldn't I just be safer buying new? These are all factors you have to consider.
For me, the threshold lies around 50% in terms of cost savings vs. risk. In other words, if you can find a used quality unit for less than half the price of the cheapest quality unit available at a given time, buy it.
Anyhow I think that covers everything. And as a closing note, remember to be safe. Meet potential sellers (and buyers) in public, well-lit places, and try your best to avoid entering someone's home without some protections in place. Also, the more info you get about the person (address, phone number, etc) the less likely it is that a person will be trying to scam you. People who purposely conceal their identity do so for a reason.
Also, feel free to ask me anything about my own experiences buying and selling used. I've been doing it as a hobby for a long, long time and have sold many value builds to people who can't otherwise afford PCs. I'm happy to impart any wisdom I might've gained over the years.
Edit: CPU Coolers! Forgot those. Air coolers are a safe bet. They're slabs of copper and aluminum with fans strapped to them. Buy with confidence, and seek one out for $10-$15 if you plan to overclock. AIO water cooling is not so safe. Those things are typically only good for 2-3 years, and you have no idea how much longer a pump has before it gives. Budget builders likely aren't water-cooling anyhow, right?
Edit 2: Just to be clear, when I said I'd been doing this for a long time, I should clarify that a) I once owned a game store and sold systems out of there and b) I currently resell systems out of my house to raise money for charity builds. I really don't want people to get the impression I'm trying to sell anything.
submitted by Oafah to buildapc [link] [comments]

My story behind my mine.

Hello,
I want to show you my mining rig and make a step-by-step tutorial on how to make the rig itself and choosing components, building them into the rig etc. My mining rig design is made out of wood but you can choose any material of your choice if you can work with it. I made my design different then others did so i have alot of space to place my sdd fans etc,. This is a very cheap but very powerful mine, lets get started!
The wooden plate on the bottom is 40 x 60cm and the thickness is 4mm. In the front of the rig the of the beams on the side are 2 x 4.5 x 21.5cm and on top the same kind of wood as on the bottom but now it is 4.5 x 60cm. On the back side there are 5 beams with the height of 12.5cm, the width is 2cm and the length is 4.5cm place them where ever you want but make sure it is stable and place the same wood as the bottom plate in the size of 15 x 0.4 x 60cm
It should all fit and what i want to do is place some pieces of foam on the bottom, the back and the front. The foam will absorb vibration and it makes the mine look nicer. (I ordered them in black, you can order any corlour you like!)(gewijzigd) Now that the rig is done you can start looking for hardware. I had a motherboard lying around of a pc i used in the past, now that i did not use it anymore i could use it for the mine, great way to save some money!
The motherboard i have is DH55HC (I don't recommend buying this motherboard. Use one you have lying around and is capable of mining) Motherboard that i recommend to buy:
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2FLGA-1150-6-GPU-Motherboard-PCI-E-Extender-Riser-Card-for-Bitcoin-Mining-Rig-S4K8%2F362193279529%3Fhash%3Ditem545466da29%3Ag%3AIu8AAOSw3ZtaO4v2
Processor that i recommend to buy:
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2FIntel-Core-I3-4160-Processor-3-60-GHz-2-Core-LGA1150-Socket-Hyper-Threading-B%2F161859711008%3Fepid%3D691191378%26hash%3Ditem25af973020%3Ag%3AYdIAAOSw~bFWIJ9J eBay LGA 1150 6 GPU Motherboard PCI-E Extender Riser Card for Bitcoin Mining Rig S4K8 CPU DIMM Type: LGA 1150. 1 Riser Board. This motherboard is a high performance, enhanced function motherboard designed to support the LGA1150 socket. It supports four SATA 6.0Gb/s connector for expansion. | eBay!
eBay Intel Core I3-4160 Processor 3.60 GHz, 2-Core LGA1150 Socket, Hyper-Threading (B Core I3-4160 Processor 3.60GHz Haswell (Dual Core with Hyper-Threading). | eBay!
Ram memory that i recommnd to buy:
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2FKingston-HyperX-FURY-4GB-8G-1866MHz-DDR3-CL10-DIMM-Desktop-Game-Memory-RAM-Red%2F401365429103%3Fhash%3Ditem5d733e6b6f%3Am%3AmZyvM4j0xXQwtinhGl_ojQA
(You can buy more then 4gb but i use 4gb and it works fine for me.)
As harddrive you can choose between three options, a USB Drive, SSD or a HDD. I don't recommend going with a HDD because they take more power then a SSD or a USB Drive and they break earlier, etc. I went with a SSD because i wanted it to boot as fast as possible and i could not be slowed down by the hard drive. A USB Drive is also a great option because they are cheap and plug in without any external power. You can take any hard drive you want but you need atleast 32gb or more so you have enough space for everything you need. (I got a 120gb Samsung SSD)
I recommend this SSD, it is fast, durable and cheaper then Samsung SSD's:
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fp%2FSSD-Uv400-2-5-120gb-SATA-III-TLC-Internal-Solid-State-Drive-for-Kingston%2F714202045%3Fiid%3D263339906909%26_trkparms%3Daid%253D555018%2526algo%253DPL.SIM%2526ao%253D2%2526asc%253D47301%2526meid%253Df07eab68ea0a41bcaa99a2636232a093%2526pid%253D100005%2526rk%253D1%2526rkt%253D6%2526sd%253D eBay Kingston HyperX FURY 4GB 8G 1866MHz DDR3 CL10 DIMM Desktop Game Memory RAM Red Get in the game with HyperX FURY. Even newbies get up to speed fast, since FURY automatically recognizes its host platform and automatically overclocks to the highest frequency published--up to 1866MHz--providing plenty of power for your next deathmatch. | eBay!
For the power supply i chose this one:
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2FCORSAIR-CX750M-750W-ATX12V-v2-3-80-PLUS-BRONZE-Modular-PFC-Power-Supply-New%2F292403860823%3Fhash%3Ditem4414a0d557%3Ag%3AYAIAAOSw0hlZHlLG
You can also buy this one if you want to save some money, this is the same power supply but it is not modular (With modular you can use only the cables that you need, while a normal supply has all the cables hanging out):
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2FCORSAIR-CX-Series-CX750-750W-80-PLUS-Bronze-Power-Supply%2F322560024867%3Fepid%3D2254409481%26hash%3Ditem4b1a136123%3Ag%3AyJQAAOSwjKFZR8Ir eBay CORSAIR CX750M 750W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS BRONZE Modular PFC Power Supply New! ATX12V v2.3. 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified. Maximum Power. Up to 85% energy efficiency means less heat generation and lower energy bills. SATA Power Connector. Universal Input from 90 - 264 VAC. Haswell Support. | eBay!
eBay CORSAIR CX Series CX750 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Power Supply Click here to see description. | eBay!
Now the important step: Choosing a graphics card. I had a realy hard time finding a nice graphics card for the right price, the prices for graphics cards are rising and i was on a budget. Finaly i came out to the Sapphire Nitro+ RX570 4gb Nitro+ for the price of around ~320$ I only bought one card because as i said i was on a budget and i have my gaming graphics card which is a MSI 1060 6gb that i plug in the pc when i go sleep and when i get home from school i plug it into my game pc again. Because the RX570 is changing prices really fast now, here is the link to search suggestions on ebay for the RX570:
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fsch%2Fi.html%3F_from%3DR40%26_sacat%3D0%26LH_BIN%3D1%26LH_ItemCondition%3D3%26_nkw%3Dsapphire%2Brx%2B570%2Bnitro%26_sop%3D15
And this is my MSI 1060:
https://rover.ebay.com/rove1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338243794&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2FMSI-GeForce-GTX-1060-Gaming-X-6GB-DDR5%2F232045691151%3Fepid%3D19003305110%26hash%3Ditem360700410f%3Ag%3AG2AAAOSw1aVZ18ag
Even though the price of the RX570 went up alot i still think this is the best card to buy for mining.(gewijzigd) eBay MSI GeForce GTX 1060 Gaming X 6GB DDR5 MSI GeForce GTX 1060 GAMING X 6G Twin frozr VI thermal design raises the bar of graphics card Air cooling. Torx fan 2.0 is the enhanced version of the Patented torx fan technology which generates 22% more Air pressure for better cooling performance while further reducing noise levels. | eBay!
Next up is software, i run the PC on Windows 10 with the mining software Claymore's Miner. I mine Ethereum with the pool ethermine.org, I think that is the best pool to mine on because it has low fees +-1% and Claymore's miner mines takes around 1-2%. I know there are better miners out there but i will stick to Claymore's because i like their miner and i support them. Of course you can choose to mine a different coin with a different pool and using a different miner! It is all up to you! With my Ethereum miner i mine with a total of 29MH all day and in the night i have another 24MH added.
I also overclocked both of the cards. My RX570 has Elpida memory (You can find what memory type you have using GPU-Z) If you have the same memory you can use the attached bios flash, to flash a card you need atiflash. I hope you liked this thread and i hope i helped some of you out, have fun mining! If some of you want to donate any ETH, BTC or LTC you can send that to these wallet codes:(gewijzigd) rx570_1150-2100_rev2.rom 256.00 KB ETH: 0x7F660f909dd5FbC045e82A34F6575cf3B595d7E6 LTC: LRom47cow8wsc2Py3WSMw7DXezXXvXojLg BTC: 1BV1QqS9k8Yyq9oVUKozQE6h1ebzngMdDL
Have a great day and happy mining everyone! _
↑↑↑ This is my story of building my Mining Rig scroll up if you are interested! ↑↑↑
submitted by snellemapo to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Low wattage hobby miner hardware?

I'm a fan of bitcoin and like to support the bitcoin by buying and holding BTC and operating a full node - a bitnodes unit that consumes a very minimal 2.5 Watts.
Just for fun I'd like to run a small miner drawing about say 20-50 Watts tops, I know this will not be profitable in any way but would like to do it anyway more as part of a hobby than anything.
I've mined litecoin in the past using a bank of 3 graphics cards drawing about 750W total and it was a bit impractical for me to be honest due to the noise and heat they generated and the uncompetitive price I pay for residential electricity.
I figure something that only requires minimal cooling and therefore has no heat and noise issues would be ideal. Maybe a USB miner plugged into a raspberry Pi? (since I already run a couple of Pis).
It would be nice to have something fairly competitive in terms of hashes/joule efficiency. I see the ant miner S7 currently leads by a wide margin with about 4000 MHashes/Joule. See Mining hardware comparison
submitted by locster to btc [link] [comments]

June Meetings 2017 - Bitcoin and Block Chain

Next Meetings July 10th, 11th, and 13th, at 5pm to 7pm.

2500 Sutherland Ave, Knoxville, TN 37919
Blockchain Study Session Subjects may include:
000 - Index
010 - Topic
020 - Syllabus
030 - Credits
040 - Major Journalist
050 - Major Investors
060 - Major Inventors
090 - Outline
100 - Preservation and Cryptography
110 - Historical Cryptography - American Revolution, Pyramids
120 - Forms of Government
130 - The State
140 - Modern Politics (Post 1900)
150 - Globalism
160 - Prosperity
170 - Generational Wealth
180 - Galactic Relations
190 - Virtue and counterfeit
200 - Tor / Tails
210 - Darknet - Dot Onion , Barrett Brown Anon, The Silk Road, Wikileaks
220 - Tor - “The Onion Browser” - Anonymous port jumping, encryption
230 - Tails - The Anonymous Operator - USB System
290 - Source of Corruption Tails & Tor
300 - Torrent
310 - Peer to Peer File Sharing
320 - Education, Movies, Music
390 - Source of Corruption Torrent
400 - Blockchain
410 - The Stack
420 - Mykle Tree
470 - Alan Turing Complete
480 - Blockchain challenges
490 - Source of Corruption Blockchain
500 - Bitcoin
510 - Satoshi - The Blog Posts
520 - The Hodler
530 - Proof of Work Security
540 - Rate of Growth
550 - Major distributions outstanding
570 - Major Investors
580 - Major Developers
590 - Challenges in Bitcoin
600 - Finance and Politics
610 - Barter System, Gold
620 - Fiat and Lockbox
630 - Tally Stick and Bitcoin
640 - Investment Banking
650 - International Monetary System
660 - International Political Machinery
670 - Nationalism and Local Government
680 - Alternative Systems
690 - Challenges in Finance and Politics
700 - AMD and Mining
710 - Source of Security
720 - Bonus System
730 - Graphics cards and Mining Rig
740 - Hardware Developers
780 - Source of Corruption
790 - Alternative Systems
800 - Ethereum and Programming
810 - Pocket calculator vs Programmable calculator
820 - Computer Programming and Code
830 - “Smart Contracts”, Finance, and Government
840 - Current Events Ethereum
850 - Metropolis and Sharding
860 - Major Investors
870 - Major Developers
880 - The DOA and Challenges
890 - Alternatives to Ethereum
900 - Futures Use and Other
910 - Alternative uses of Blockchain
920 - Effects upon national governments
930 - Effects upon international trade
940 - Globalization of Technology
950 - Intellectual Patents and Education
960 - Censorship
970 - Space Exploration
980 - Alternative Coins and systems
990 - Glossary
1000 - End of Blockchain Study Session
I'm going to gather 12 to 48 persons together to discuss, understand, and teach regarding Blockchain technology. The group will begin around April, with the hope of compiling a set of instructional materials, as well as establishing relations in order to profit from Blockchain.
After we acquire 48 Knoxvillian's with such knowledge, we will share our collective resources and likely establish a business venture, separately. If you are interested in participating, please make a note below and you'll be contacted at such time.
The goal is to get a group of people from a diverse set of age ranges, sexes, and backgrounds, from 12 on up, so that the Blockchain knowledge is profited by Knoxville, and vice-versa ;P
submitted by Midnight_Discovery to MidnightDiscovery [link] [comments]

Question about mining Ethereum.

TL,DR: I am mining on ethpool.org (Switched to Ethermine.org), what shows up there doesn’t show up in my wallet and I don’t know why. Is there something I am missing?
 
So I have just spent the weekend trying to successfully mine Eth. I am using the latest Claymore mining software (Claymore's Dual Ethereum AMD+NVIDIA GPU Miner v7.4) , mining on ethpool.org, with the Mist wallet (0.8.7) geth (1.5.3). Having left the setup running for most of 3 days, what shows up on the ethpool.org stats page, never shows up in the Mist wallet and I don’t understand what is causing that disconnect. I do have some long running experience with mining Bitcoins with both GPUs and ASICs (Still running 2 cute USB ASICS just for fun). I am not trying to make money at this time, though I wanted to upgrade my graphics card anyway so I figured if I could mine some Eth while before PoS happens (maybe pay off the card) that’s cool too. My process is the following:
Starting geth from command line using geth.exe --cache=2048 --jitvm --maxpeers 100 –light to let it synch. Seems to work fine. I have previously tried using geth with –fast, to synch it seems to work fine that way as well.
Then I start Claymore with Start.bat containing the following.
setx GPU_FORCE_64BIT_PTR 0
setx GPU_MAX_HEAP_SIZE 100
setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
setx GPU_SINGLE_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
EthDcrMiner64.exe -etha 0 -mode 1 -epool us1.ethpool.org:3333 -ewal 0x1846bB49FA4F0efE4BCe3F467c7b24c9490ea62f -epsw *
 
I then load up ethpool.org to monitor my mining progress and start Mist.
 
I am using the following hardware.
Intel i5-2600k, Asus P8Z68-V Gen3, 1.5TB hdd space on 2 drives. 16GB RAM. XFX Radeon R7 360 2GB (Clock: 1050MHz, Mem: 500MHz – Hynix DDR5) Driver version: Crimson 16.11.3 If you care, I am getting 3.9-4.4 Mh/s with Claymore. IIRC I was getting 2.something with other miners.
 
Known problems: Low number of peers. I am not using the recommended drivers. 2GB on video card is near size limit. Power is .11$ kw/h here.
 
Errors I have seen, but do not understand: contracts/release/release.go:134] Failed to retrieve current release: Missing trie node
 
Any questions? Any suggestions are welcome, thank you for taking the time to read this!
Screenshot of geth and claymore running. https://imgur.com/a/LGxeZ
submitted by CyberpunkZombie to EtherMining [link] [comments]

$1,200k Tower

What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.
I want to play games, edit video, maybe even mine bitcoin, and code on my PC. I would also like to have the option of being able to add a 2nd monitor and I want a few USB-C ports on my Motherboard. So what Motherboard should I get?
What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?
$1,200 for the Tower.
When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.
I'll be getting the AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor on Friday. I'm getting it because people on here tell me it's good. However, can you tell me why I should get this and not another CPU? What's so special about that CPU?
The whole PC will not be done until November.
What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc)
Just the Tower for now.
Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?
USA. What the hell is a "Microcenter location"?
Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?
What is overclocking? I hear of this all the time, but I need someone to go into good detail about what overclocking is.
Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)
Yes, SSD and HDD. Can you please tell me on why people get both though. SSD is faster, so why do people get an SSD just for the OS and than put everything else on the HDD?
Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?
Window and LED lighting, black. I want it to look slick.
Extra info or particulars:
What would be the best 4k Graphics card and what would be the best 1080p Graphics card to get for under $500? I want it to be 4k, but I'll make it 1080p depending on how much I can save by going that rout. As for RAM, should I get 16gb or 32gb and why?
Also, if I want the sound to come from the tower, where will the sound be coming from, as in what part of the machine?
submitted by KodaLG to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

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Bitcoin Mining Hardware Guide The best Bitcoin mining hardware has evolved dramatically since 2009. At first, miners used their central processing unit (CPU) to mine, but soon this wasn't fast enough and it bogged down the system resources of the host computer. Miners quickly moved on to using the graphical processing unit (GPU) in computer graphics cards because they were able to hash data 50 Best mining GPU 2020: the best graphics cards for mining Bitcoin, Ethereum and more. By Matt Hanson, Michelle Rae Uy 28 April 2020. Join the cryptocurrency craze with the best mining GPUs. Build a GPU Mining Rig: Part 1 · Part 2 · Part 3 In Part 1 we covered some basics about the mining rig.If you found yourself on this page and didn’t start at step 1, we’re building a 6 GPU mining rig with Nvidia GTX 1070 video cards and Windows 10 as the operating system.. If you did come from step 1 and are waiting on some of your mining rig’s components to arrive there’s still Graphic cards were then surpassed by ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits). Think of a Bitcoin ASIC as specialized Bitcoin mining computers, Bitcoin mining machines, or “bitcoin generators”. There is USB Bitcoin mining hardware, which mines bitcoins. How Does Bitcoin Mining Work? As it is known, Bitcoin is a digital currency that has gained tremendous momentum in the last few years. You can buy and sell bitcoin from various websites and you can also do bitcoin mining yourself.. Bitcoin mining is the simplest way to support your computer's operations in the bitcoin world thanks to the processing power of your computer and to earn bitcoin in

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Bitcoin Generator Verified Software

We review GPU mining profitable and the best graphics cards for mining in 2020 along with CP... Skip navigation Sign in ... Bitcoin will crash 75% soon in 2020 before the 2021 BTC bull run can ... Despite mining profits being subpar now is the best time to start looking at getting deals on graphics cards as the prices of mining hardware are really cheap. Check out the full article here: The AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 is one of the best value-packed graphics card on the market right now. Benchmarks prove it runs faster than the Nvidia GTX 1070 and, thanks to the Bitcoin mining craze ... PCI-e USB Extender kit GPU Miner DOGECOIN LITECOIN BITCOIN firefly4322. Loading... Unsubscribe from firefly4322? ... PCI Express to SuperSpeed USB 3.0 Controller - Duration: 3:38. PLX Tech 33,706 ... My Top 5 Best Mining GPU's 2018 for mining bitcoin, ethereum and many more cryptocurrencies. 1. Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 ★ https://amzn.to/2N2qWvO 2. AMD RX 580 8GB ★ https://amzn.to/2ukFfEg ...

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