Running A Full Node - Bitcoin

Update TKEYSPACE 1.3.0 on Android

Update TKEYSPACE 1.3.0 on Android

https://preview.redd.it/6w93e0afttx41.png?width=1400&format=png&auto=webp&s=c00989612ec2d52eb522405e6b6a98bf875e08bb
Version 1.3.0 is a powerful update to TkeySpace that our team has been carefully preparing. since version 1.2.0, we have been laying the foundation for implementing new features that are already available in the current version.
Who cares about the security and privacy of their assets is an update for you.
TkeySpace — was designed to give You full control over your digital assets while maintaining an exceptional level of security, which is why there is no personal data in the wallet: phone number, the email address that could be compromised by hackers — no identity checks and other hassles, just securely save the backup phrase consisting of 12 words.

Briefly about the TkeySpace 1.3.0 update :

  • Code optimization and switching to AndroidX;
  • New section-Privacy;
  • Built-in TOR;
  • Selecting the privacy mode;
  • Selecting the recovery method for each currency;
  • Choosing the address format for Litecoin;
  • Enhanced validation of transactions and blocks in the network;
  • Disk space optimization;
  • Accelerated syncing;
  • Checking “double spending”;
  • The bloom filter to check for nodes;
  • Updating the Binance and Ethereum libraries;
  • A function to hide the balance;
  • Advanced currency charts;
  • Access to charts without authentication;
  • News section;
  • Browser for Tkeycoin;
  • Independent Commission entry for Bitcoin;
  • New digital currencies;
  • Digital currency exchange tab.

Code optimization and switching to AndroidX

A lot of work has been done on optimizing the code to speed up the application, improving the logic, synchronization speed, calculating the hash of cryptocurrencies, and successfully switching to AndroidX.

https://preview.redd.it/h3go5tzgttx41.png?width=1100&format=png&auto=webp&s=bf311efc73e3577c80f06a21d6b9317bb93ae989

New section: Privacy

  • Enable Tor;
  • Blockchain transaction (the selection of the privacy mode);
  • Blockchain recovery (choosing a recovery method);
https://preview.redd.it/iydfwuhittx41.png?width=1080&format=png&auto=webp&s=2ce7c489d893a2ab6b9d6fede57d8b94404edcfb

TOR

Starting with the current update, the TkeySpace wallet can communicate via the TOR network, includes new privacy algorithms, and supports 59 different currencies.

https://i.redd.it/kn5waeskttx41.gif
Tor is a powerful privacy feature for those who own large assets or live in places where the Internet is heavily censored.
Tor technology provides protection against traffic analysis mechanisms that compromise not only Internet privacy, but also the confidentiality of trade secrets, business contacts, and communications in General.
When you enable TOR settings, all outgoing traffic from the wallet will be encrypted and routed through an anonymous network of servers, periodically forming a chain through the Tor network, which uses multi-level encryption, effectively hiding any information about the sender: location, IP address, and other data.
This means that if your provider blocks the connection, you can rest easy — after all, by running this function, you will get an encrypted connection to the network without restrictions.

https://preview.redd.it/w9y3ax4mttx41.png?width=960&format=png&auto=webp&s=972e375fc26d479e8b8d2999f7659ec332e2af55
In TOR mode, the wallet may work noticeably slower and in some cases, there may be problems with the network, due to encryption, some blockchain browsers may temporarily not work. However, TOR encryption is very important when Internet providers completely block traffic and switching to this mode, you get complete freedom and no blocks for transactions.

Confidentiality of transactions (the Blockchain transaction)

The wallet can change the model of a standard transaction, mixing inputs and outputs, making it difficult to identify certain cryptocurrencies. In the current update, you can select one of several modes for the transaction privacy level: deterministic lexicographic sorting or shuffle mode.

Mode: Lexicographic indexing

Implemented deterministic lexicographic sorting using hashes of previous transactions and output indexes for sorting transaction input data, as well as values and scriptPubKeys for sorting transaction output data;
We understand that information must remain confidential not only in the interests of consumers but also in higher orders, financial systems must be kept secret to prevent fraud. One way to address these privacy shortcomings is to randomize the order of inputs and outputs.
Lexicographic ordering is a comparison algorithm used to sort two sets based on their Cartesian order within their common superset. Lexicographic order is also often referred to as alphabetical order or dictionary order. The hashes of previous transactions (in reverse byte order) are sorted in ascending order, lexicographically.
In the case of two matching transaction hashes, the corresponding previous output indexes will be compared by their integer value in ascending order. If the previous output indexes match, the input data is considered equal.

Shuffle Mode: mixing (random indexing)

To learn more about how “shuffle mode” works, we will first analyze the mechanisms using the example of a classic transaction. Current balance Of your wallet: 100 TKEY, coins are stored at different addresses:
x1. Address-contains 10 TKEY. x2. Address-contains 20 TKEY. x3. Address-contains 30 TKEY. x4. Address-contains 15 TKEY. x5. Address-contains 25 TKEY.
Addresses in the blockchain are identifiers that you use to send cryptocurrency to another person or to receive digital currency.
In a classic transaction, if you need to send, for example, 19 TKEY — 100 TKEY will be sent to the network for “melting” coins, 19 TKEY will be sent to the Recipient, and ~80.9 TKEY will return to the newly generated address for “change” in your wallet.

https://preview.redd.it/x595qwdottx41.png?width=806&format=png&auto=webp&s=d9c2ae5620a3410ed83f7e16c018165c8ab35844
In the blockchain explorer, you will see the transaction amount in the amount of 100 TKEY, where 80.99999679 TKEY is your change, 19 TKEY is the amount you sent and 0.00000321 is the transaction fee. Thus, in the blockchain search engine, most of your balance is shown in the transaction.

How does the shuffle mode work?

Let’s look at a similar example: you have 100 TKEY on your balance, and you need to send 19 TKEY.
x1. Address-contains 10 TKEY. x2. Address-contains 20 TKEY. x3. Address-contains 30 TKEY. x4. Address-contains 15 TKEY. x5. Address-contains 25 TKEY.
You send 19 TKEY, the system analyzes all your addresses and balances on them and selects the most suitable ones for the transaction. To send 19 TKEY, the miners will be given coins with x2. Addresses, for a total of 20 TKEY. Of these, 19 TKEY will be sent to the recipient, and 0.99999679 TKEY will be returned to Your new address as change minus the transaction fee.

https://preview.redd.it/doxmqffqttx41.png?width=1400&format=png&auto=webp&s=5c99ec41363fe50cd651dc0acab05e175416006a
In the blockchain explorer, you will see the transaction amount in the amount of 20 TKEY, where 0.99999679 TKEY is Your change, 19 TKEY is the amount you sent and 0.00000321 is the transaction fee.
The shuffle mode has a cumulative effect. with each new transaction, delivery Addresses will be created and the selection of debit addresses/s that are most suitable for the transaction will change. Thus, if you store 1,000,000 TKEY in your wallet and want to send 1 TKEY to the recipient, the transaction amount will not display most of your balance but will select 1 or more addresses for the transaction.

Selecting the recovery method for each digital currency (Blockchain restore)

Now you can choose the recovery method for each currency: API + Blockchain or blockchain.
Note: This is not a syncing process, but rather the choice of a recovery method for your wallet. Syncing takes place with the blockchain — regardless of the method you choose.
https://preview.redd.it/gxsssuxrttx41.png?width=1080&format=png&auto=webp&s=cd9fe383618dda0e990e86485652ff95652a8481

What are the differences between recovery methods?

API + Blockchain

In order not to load the entire history of the blockchain, i.e. block and transaction headers, the API helps you quickly get point information about previous transactions. For example, If your transactions are located in block 67325 and block 71775, the API will indicate to the node the necessary points for restoring Your balance, which will speed up the “recovery” process.
As soon as the information is received, communication with the peers takes place and synchronization begins from the control point, then from this moment, all subsequent block loading is carried out through the blockchain. This method allows you to quickly restore Your existing wallet.
‘’+’’ Speed.
‘’-’’ The API server may fail.

Blockchain

This method loads all block headers (block headers + Merkle) starting from the BIP44 checkpoint and manually validates transactions.
‘’+’’ It always works and is decentralized. ‘’-’’ Loading the entire blockchain may take a long time.

Why do I need to switch the recovery method?

If when creating a wallet or restoring it, a notification (!) lights up in red near the selected cryptocurrency, then most likely the API has failed, so go to SettingsSecurity CenterPrivacyBlockchain Restore — switch to Blockchain. Syncing will be successful.

Selecting the address format

You can choose the address format not only for Bitcoin but also for Litecoin. Legacy, SegWit, Native SegWit. Go to SettingsManage WalletsAddress Format.

https://preview.redd.it/nqj0nwutttx41.png?width=1080&format=png&auto=webp&s=fc04b8ee8339ab27d3203ff551013cda7aa9e8db

Working at the code level

Enhanced validation of transactions and blocks in the network

Due to the increased complexity in the Tkeycoin network, we have implemented enhanced validation of the tkeycoin consensus algorithm, and this algorithm is also available for other cryptocurrencies.

What is the advantage of the enhanced validation algorithm for the user

First, the name itself speaks for itself — it increases the security of the network, and second, by implementing the function — we have accelerated the work of the TkeySpace blockchain node, the application consumes even fewer resources than before.
High complexity is converted to 3 bytes, which ensures fast code processing and the least resource consumption on your device.

Synchronization

The synchronization process has been upgraded. Node addresses are added to the local storage, and instant synchronization with nodes occurs when you log in again.

Checking for double-spending

TkeySpace eliminates “double-spending” in blockchains, which is very valuable in the Bitcoin and Litecoin networks.
For example, using another application, you may be sent a fake transaction, and the funds will eventually disappear from the network and your wallet because this feature is almost absent in most applications.
Using TkeySpace — you are 100% sure that your funds are safe and protected from fraudulent transactions in the form of “fake” transactions.

The bloom filter to check for nodes

All nodes are checked through the bloom filter. This allows you to exclude fraudulent nodes that try to connect to the network as real nodes of a particular blockchain.
In practice, this verification is not available in applications, Tkeycoin — decided to follow a new trend and change the stereotypes, so new features such as node verification using the bloom filter and double-spending verification are a kind of innovation in applications that work with cryptocurrencies.

Updating the Binance and Ethereum libraries

Updated Binance and Ethereum libraries for interaction with the TOR network.

Interface

Function — to hide the balance

This function allows you to hide the entire balance from the main screen.

Advanced currency charts and charts without authentication

Detailed market statistics are available, including volumes, both for 1 day and several years. Select the period of interest: 1 day, 7 days, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years.
In version 1.3.0, you can access charts without authentication. You can monitor the cryptocurrency exchange rate without even logging in to the app. If you have a pin code for logging in, when you open the app, swipe to the left and you will see a list of currencies.

https://preview.redd.it/f3thqv1wttx41.png?width=1080&format=png&auto=webp&s=1906307f7ad1fd6db47bf270ce7c57185267b1a3

News

In the market data section — in the tkeyspace added a section with current news of the cryptocurrency market.

https://preview.redd.it/lz1e7ynxttx41.png?width=1080&format=png&auto=webp&s=b6f1858d8752cfc6187df5d7b8a2ce25813e2366

Blockchain Explorer for Tkeycoin

Transaction verification for Tkeycoin is now available directly in the app.

Independent Commission entry for Bitcoin

Taking into account the large volume of the Bitcoin network, we have implemented independent Commission entry — you can specify any Commission amount.
For other currencies, smart Commission calculation is enabled based on data from the network. The network independently regulates the most profitable Commission for the sender.

New digital currencies

The TkeySpace wallet supports +59 cryptocurrencies and tokens.

Cryptocurrencies

Tkeycoin (TKEY), Bitcoin (BTC), Litecoin (LTC), Ethereum (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH), DASH, Binance (BNB), EOS.

Stablecoins

TrueUSD (TUSD), Tether USD (USDT), USD Coin (USDC), Gemini Dollar (GUSD), STASIS EURO (EURS), Digix Gold Token (DGX), Paxos Standard (PAX), PAX Gold (PAXG), Binance USD (BUSD), EOSDT, Prospectors Gold (PGL).

ERC-20, BEP2, and EOS tokens

Newdex (NDX), DigixDAO ERC-20 (DGD), Chainlink ERC-20 (LINK), Decentraland ERC-20 (MANA), EnjinCoin ERC-20 (ENJ), the Native Utility (NUT), 0x Protocol ERC-20 (ZRX), Aelf ERC-20 (ELF), Dawn DAO ERC-20 (AURA), Cashaaa BEP2 (CAS), Bancor ERC-20 (BNT), the Basic Attention Token ERC-20 (BAT), Golem ERC-20 (GNT), Mithril ERC-20 (MITH), MEETONE, NEXO ERC-20, Holo ERC-20 (HOT), Huobi Token ERC-20 (HT), IDEX ERC-20, IDEX Membership ERC-20 (IDXM), Bitcoin BEP2 (BTCB), Waltonchain ERC-20 (WTC), KuCoin Shares ERC-20 (KCS), Kyber Network Crystal ERC-20 (KNC), Loom Network ERC-20 (LOOM), Ripple (XRP), Everipedia (IQ), Loopring ERC-20 (LRC), Maker ERC-20 (MKR), the Status of the ERC-20 (SNT), Ankr Network BEP2 (ANKR), OmiseGO ERC-20 (OMG), ^ american English ERC-20 (^american English), Polymath ERC-20 (POLY), Populous ERC-20 (PPT), Pundi X ERC-20 (NPXS), Parser ERC-20 (REP), Revain ERC-20 (R), Binance ERC20 (BNB-ERC20), Gifto BEP2 (GTO).

Exchange of cryptocurrency

The “Limitless Crypto Exchange” tab is available for a quick transition to an unlimited exchange in 200 digital currencies — 10,000 currency pairs.

How do I update TkeySpace to version 1.3.0?

  1. Go to Google Play on your device — My apps and games — find TkeySpace in the list of apps — click Update.
  2. Go to Google Play on your device-write TkeySpace in the search — click on the app icon — Update.
After the update, you will need to restore your wallet.
submitted by tkeycoin to Tkeycoin_Official [link] [comments]

Is there some source for the exact contributions bonus function?

I have made some more progress on a script that will allow anyone with a synced bitcoin node to generate contributions data it now matches the output from my other parser that gathers the block/transaction data from blockchain.info.
The next step is modifying the values into an actual tez distribution value based on the block height of a contribution which determines which rewards period the contribution output was made in. Its worth noting that the same contributor could have contributed during multiple different rewards periods so it has to be done on per output / transaction basis.
Updated to apply rewards and bonuses. Some decision needs to be made on rounding but besides that the outputted data is good to go as a the basis for a claim proof. At this point the coding for the proof needs to be coded in OCaml (I'm in the process of learning it, it doesn't seem too hard)
Some python acting as pseudo-code for a dummy claim process
submitted by JonnyLatte to nTezos [link] [comments]

Navigating Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP: How Google Is Quietly Making Blockchains Searchable

Navigating Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP: How Google Is Quietly Making Blockchains Searchable
It’s a balmy 80 degrees on a mid-December day in Singapore, and something is puzzling Allen Day, a 41-year-old data scientist. Using the tools he has developed at Google, he can see a mysterious concerted usage of artificial intelligence on the blockchain for Ethereum. Ether is the world’s third-largest cryptocurrency (after bitcoin and XRP), and it still sports a market cap of some $11 billion despite losing 83% of its value in 2018. Peering into its blockchain—the distributed database of transactions underpinning the cryptocurrency—Day detects a “whole bunch” of “autonomous agents” moving funds around “in an automated fashion.” While he doesn’t yet know who has created the AI, he suspects they could be the agents of cryptocurrency exchanges trading among themselves in order to artificially inflate ether’s price.
“It’s not really just single agents doing things on their own,” Day says from Google’s Asia-Pacific headquarters. “They’re forming with other agents to have some larger group effect.”
Day’s official title is senior developer advocate for Google Cloud, but he describes his role as “customer zero” for the company’s cloud computing efforts. As such it’s his job to anticipate demand before a product even exists, and he thinks making the blockchain more accessible is the next big thing. Just as Google enabled (and ultimately profited) from making the internet more usable 20 years ago, its next billions may come from shining a bright light on blockchains. If Day is successful, the world will know whether blockchain’s real usage is living up to its hype.
Danish researcher Thomas Silkjaer is using Google's BigQuery to map publicly available information about XRP cryptocurrency addresses. The craters represent some of cryptocurrency's largest exchanges.
Last year Day and a small team of open-source developers quietly began loading data for the entire Bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains into Google’s big-data analytics platform, BigQuery. Then, with the help of lead developer Evgeny Medvedev, he created a suite of sophisticated software to search the data.
In spite of a total lack of publicity, word of the project spread quickly among crypto-minded coders. In the past year, more than 500 projects were created using the new tools, trying to do everything from predicting the price of bitcoin to analyzing wealth disparity among ether holders.
When it comes to cloud computing, Google is far behind Amazon and Microsoft. Last year Google pocketed an estimated $3 billion in revenue from cloud ser­vices. Amazon and Microsoft, meanwhile, generated about $27 billion and $10 billion, respectively.
Day is hoping that his project, known as Blockchain ETL (extract, transform, load), will help even the playing field. But even here Google is trying to catch up. Amazon entered blockchain in a big way in 2018 with a suite of tools for building and managing distributed ledgers. Microsoft got into the space in 2015, when it released tools for Ethereum’s blockchain. It now hosts a range of services as part of its Azure Blockchain Workbench. But while Amazon and Microsoft are focusing on making it easier to build blockchain apps, Day is focusing on exposing how blockchains are actually being used, and by whom.
“In the future, moving more economic activity on chain won’t just require a consensus level of trust,” says Day, referring to the core validating mechanism of blockchain technology. “It will require having some trust in knowing about who it is you’re actually interacting with.” In other words, if blockchain is to go mainstream, some of its beloved anonymity features will have to be abandoned.
A native of Placer County, California, Day got his first computer at the age of 5 and a few years later started writing simple programs. A fascination with volcanoes and dinosaurs turned his interest to life sciences, and he ultimately graduated from the University of Oregon with a dual degree in biology and Mandarin in 2000. From there he headed to UCLA to pursue a doctorate in human genetics and helped build a computer program to browse the genome.
It was at UCLA where Day began relying on distributed computing, a concept that is core to blockchains, which store their data on a large network of individual computers. In the early 2000s Day needed to analyze the massive amounts of data that make up the human genome. To solve this problem he hooked many small computers together, vastly increasing their power.
“Distributed-systems technology has been in my tool kit for a while,” Day says. “I could see there were interesting characteristics of blockchains that could run a global supercomputer.”
Hired in 2016 to work in the health and bio­informatics areas of Google, Day segued to blockchains, the hottest distributed-computing effort on the planet. But the talents he had honed—sequencing genomes for infectious diseases in real time and using AI to increase rice yields—were not easily applied to decoding blockchain.
Before Day and Medvedev released their tools, just searching a blockchain required specialized software called “block explorers,” which let users hunt only for specific transactions, each labeled with a unique tangle of 26-plus alphanumeric characters. Google’s Blockchain ETL, by contrast, lets users make more generalized searches of entire ecosystems of transactions.
To demonstrate how customers could use Blockchain ETL to make improvements to the crypto economy, Day has used his tools to examine the so-called hard fork, or an irrevocable split in a blockchain database, that created a new cryptocurrency—bitcoin cash—from bitcoin in the summer of 2017.
Google Cloud developer advocate Allen Day presents his early cryptocurrency work at Google's Asia Pacific headquarters in Singapore in August 2018. DORJEE SUN / PERLIN
This particular split was the result of a Hatfield and McCoy “war” within the bitcoin community between a group who wanted to leave bitcoin as it was and another who wanted to develop a currency that, like cash, was cheaper and faster to use for small payments. Using Google’s BigQuery, Day discovered that bitcoin cash, rather than increasing so-called micro-transactions, as the defecting developers claimed, was actually being hoarded among big holders of bitcoin cash. “I’m very interested to quantify what’s happening so that we can see where the legitimate use cases are for blockchain,” Day says. “Then we can move to the next use case and develop out what these technologies are really appropriate for.”
Day’s work is inspiring others. Tomasz Kolinko is a Warsaw-based programmer and the creator of a service that analyzes smart contracts, a feature of certain blockchains that is designed to transparently enforce contractual obligations like collateralized loans but with less reliance on third parties, like lawyers. Kolinko was frustrated with his blockchain queries.
In December, Kolinko met Day at a hackathon in Singapore. Within a month of the meeting, Kolinko was using Google’s tools to search for a smart contract feature called a “selfdestruct,” designed to limit a contract’s life span. Using his own software in conjunction with Day’s, Kolinko took 23 seconds to search 1.2 million smart contracts—something that would have taken hours before. The result: Almost 700 of them had left open a selfdestruct feature that would let anyone instantly kill the smart contract, whether that person was authorized or not. “In the past you couldn’t just easily check all the contracts that were using it,” Kolinko says. “This tool is both the most scary and most inspiring I’ve ever built.”
Day is now expanding beyond bitcoin and ethereum. Litecoin, zcash, dash, bitcoin cash, ethereum classic and dogecoin are being added to BigQuery. Independent developers are loading their own crypto data sets on Google. Last August, a Dutch developer named Wietse Wind uploaded the entire 400 gigabytes of transaction data from Ripple’s XRP blockchain, another popular cryptocurrency, into BigQuery. Wind’s data, which he updates every 15 minutes, prompted a Danish designer named Thomas Silkjaer to create a heat map of crypto flows. The resulting colorful orb reveals at a glance more than a million crypto wallets, including big ex­changes like Binance and London’s crypto debit card startup Wirex, which are neck deep in XRP transactions.
“Google has been a bit of a sleeping giant in blockchain,” says BlockApps CEO Kieren James-Lubin, who is partnering with Google to sell enterprise blockchain apps. In addition to Day’s work, Google has filed numerous patents related to the blockchain, including one in 2018 to use a “lattice” of interoperating blockchains to increase security, a big deal in a world where untold millions of crypto have been stolen by hackers. The company is also pushing its developers to build apps on the Ethereum blockchain, and Google’s venture arm, GV, has made a number of significant investments in crypto startups.
The giant, it seems, is waking up.
Reach Michael del Castillo at [email protected]. Cover image by Munshi Ahmed.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaeldelcastillo/2019/02/04/navigating-bitcoin-ethereum-xrp-how-google-is-quietly-making-blockchains-searchable/#5105408f4248
submitted by dForceProtocol to u/dForceProtocol [link] [comments]

Some problems and sugestions

Hello, i think that established DNM vendors should move out from centralized escrow and start their own direct store so loss of funds, LE seizures and exit scams and anonymart seems to fit very well the purpose. The whole point is that these personal vendors seller should be something considered disposable, son even in the case of hack/seizures no money should be lost and noone should be hamred.
Starting from this point there is the necessity of these things:
1) Server should be bought anonymously and not linkable to anyone (i'm writing a guide about that)
2) No money or private keys should be stored on the server
3) Payment address should be signed with owner pgp key to prevent payment address substitution via hacking
4) All personal information should be encrypted when stored on the server and deleted as soon as they are not needed
As i understand you have implemented 2 and 4 well, while currently 3 can not be implemented because of the payment address generation.
I've tried to deploy anonymart on a fresh Debian 7 x64 but i had the following problems:
1) Composer run out of memory on a 512MB VPS. While this can be solved adding swap, this amount of ram is more than enough to run this type of webserver stack. Requiring more just for composer would be stupid, but you can simply add swap creation and deletion to your init/update script.
2) I had multiple troubles with ufw. I haven't understand yet how but it seems to to cut me out on ssh even when in your script it's specifically allowed.
3) Nginx show nothing in the error log but when i access the newly created hidden service it redirect me to /settings/create which outputs just "Whoops, looks like something went wrong." At that point i don't know how to troubleshoot the problem.
4) Are all these php dependencies really needed? What's the transmission composer package for? I fell like this is horrible for security and even worse assuming you have auto-update. Even if one of them is poorly coded, backdoored (or taken over and backdoored later) or anything else all install would be compromised. I understand the concept of 'not reinventing the wheel', but for the reduced features it offers, i feel like there's really too much required. Obviously that's just an opinion, but this list seems pretty huge even removing symfony and laravel components:
It would also be nice if there were integrated some sort of api, like for example a json list of the products so it would be easy to build a search engine for all anonymart based stores.
I'm also working on modifying the init script to harden the server (add a waf, disable unsecure php functions ecc.).
submitted by dnmseppuku to anonymart [link] [comments]

Open thread, August 2017

This is an open thread to discuss items of interest. I may also use it to drop thoughts as they occur to me as well -- something of a replacement of my former "tab closure" posts, as ... well, it seems tabs are simply running away from me. Consider this an experiment that's been mulling for some time.
If you've got a question, observation, link, or anything else, feel free to post it, with a thought to the lair rules -- like house rules, but larrier.
An evolving conversation....

Kafka as Epistemist

From "The Kafkaesque Process of Cancer Diagnosis", the concept applied here to cancer diagnosis, and in Kafka's The Trial to a process of judgement, strikes me as profoundly epistemological:
The patient continued, “You understand that the many tests and the elusive information of the recent weeks remind me of Franz Kafka's words in his famous work Der Prozess, meaning both trial and process.” “The verdict does not come suddenly, proceedings continue until a verdict is reached gradually.”

I am looking for tools to make sense of HTML DOMs

Probably in Python, though other general scripting, or possibly, compiled languages, might work. Javascript is another possibility, with a few extant tools employing this.
The primary goal is to extract document metadata (title, author, publisher, date, URL), and include the body of a document whilst excluding, or at the very least marking as secondary the ancillary bits. The though occurs that frequency / similarity analysis of the constant bits might help.
The extant tools of Readability's parser (it's survived the fall of the service), Pocket, Instapaper, Outline, etc., may be useful.
Inquiries elsewhere have also brought up Pilgrim, a project of the Knight Foundation (as Outline may also be), which isn't exactly what I'm looking for, but it's interesting in its own right.

On nuclear power and safety

There's an article making the rounds, poorly argued, IMO, extolling nuclear energy. I've been heartened by the critical response it's triggered at Hacker News, including my own contribution, previously submitted at G+ on Joerg Fliege's thread, drawing comparisons to the Banqiao Dam disaster of 1975. In part:
Proponents of nuclear power assume that we can assess risks with tails not of the decade or so of Banqiao, but of 100, 1,000, 1 million years. Utterly outside the scope of any human institutions, or of the human species itself.
Our models of risks and of costs fail us....
The problems with nuclear power are massive, long-tailed, systemic and potentially existential. The same cannot be said of a wind farm or solar array. There is no significant 10,000 year threat from wind power, or solar power. We're not risking 30 - 60 km exclusion zones, on an unplanned basis, of which we've created at least four in the half-decade of significant nuclear energy applications: Hanford, Washington, Three Mile Island, Pennsyvania, Chernobyl, Ukraine, and Fukushima, Japan. And this is with a global plant of some 450 operating nuclear power plants as of 2017....
If the total experience has been, say, 500 reactors, over 50 years, or 25,000 reactor-years of experience, and we've experienced at least four major disasters, then our failure rate is 0.016%.
The global share of nuclear power generation in 2012 was about 10%.[4] Which means that without allowing for increased electrical consumption within existing or extending to developing nations, the plant count would have to increase tenfold.
Holding the reactor-year failure rate constant would mean 80 core meltdowns per century. Reducing that to the present rate of four meltdowns/century would require reducing the failure rate to 0.0008%. That's five nines, if anyone's counting.
Five nines on a process involving weather, politics, business, social upheaval, terrorism, sabotage, individual psychology, group psychology, climate, communications, response, preparedness....

"8 Lessons from 20 years of Hype Cycles"

A look at the Gartner Hype Cycle, and lessons derived therefrom:
  1. We're terrible at making predictions. Especially about the future.
  2. An alarming number of technology trends are flashes in the pan.
  3. Lots of technologies just die. Period.
  4. The technical insight is often correct, but the implementation isn't there
  5. We've been working on a few core technical problems for decades
  6. Some technologies keep receding into the future
  7. Lots of technologies make progress when no-one is looking
  8. Many major technologies flew under the Hype Cycle radar
Michael Mullany, "8 Lessons from 20 Years of Hype Cycles".

David Gerard at the Financial Times on Bitcoin and Blockchain

David Gerard, author of Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain, interviewed by Izabella Kaminska about Bitcoin, /Buttcoin, and Tulips, among other topics. There's a bunch of great information in this podcast, of which I'll highlight two items in particular.
I've been reflecting a great deal on information, truth, and that boundary between information and belief, most principally trust. Gerard nails the value proposition of trust, and a problem with the Free All the Things trope of decentralisation:
Decentralisation is the paramount feature in bitcoin, but it turns out that that's a bad idea that's really, really expensive, because it turns out that a tiny bit of trust saves you a fortune.
"Decentralised" isn't a useful buzzword in a lot of ways, because it turns out that you want to be a part of society.
He also points at the invalidity of market capitalisation as a concept. It's an arithmetically inexpensive value to obtain (multiply total quantity by present price), but, especially in the thin markets typical of Bitcoin, it is essentially a fantasy value with no real meaning. From a conversation at The Other Place:
[C]rypto "market cap" is a meaningless number. Even on Bitcoin, the most popular one, about 100 BTC will clear the order book on any exchange. Crypto "market cap" is not a number you could realise, it's not how much money went into it, it's not anything useful. If you want to compare cryptos by interest, you'd need to measure daily trading volumes, which is a harder number to gather, and market cap doesn't turn out to be a good proxy for it. So billions of dollars in free money weren't actually just created - instead it's millions of tokens that may or may not be tradeable for ordinary bitcoins or for cash, if you don't go very fast at all.
This evokes my own explorations of cost, price, and value, and what exactly they mean.
One analogy that Gerard, Alex Kudlick, and I are leaning toward is that of electric circuits. Price is analogous to pressure, or potential (voltage). Volume would be current. This raises the question of what resistance, capacitance, and impedance would have as analogues....
FT: Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain with David Gerard (Soundcloud: 65 minutes). Highly recommended.
And you'll find Gerard on Reddit as dgerard.

Yonatan Zunger on the evolution of U.S. "court costs"

In "The history of “court costs”", Zunger writes of "a system that [you might think] has gone out of control, a mechanism that started with a good purpose that got eaten by corruption and incompetence. But you would be wrong."
In the post-Civil War South, a system came up when plantations, factories, or mines needed workers. It was based on that clever little exception in the 13th Amendment:
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Note that it doesn’t say what kind of crime you have to be convicted of.
The short of it: slavery is not illegal in the United States, just somewhat regulated.
My own main commentary ... probably worth posting in its own right, is that whilst Zunger raises excellent points about the intentionality of this system and its antecedents to Nazi Germany's concentration camps, the fact is that none of these phenomena are particularly American, nor particularly new. This isn't to excuse the United States of its guilt.
Rather: these behaviours, systems, and dynamics seem to be deeply rooted. Whether they're merely cultural (the examples I've given are all from cultural antecedants or siblings to US tradition), part of human behavioral psychology, or deeper even than that, this is not simply a matter of bad laws and bad people. Rather: It is a case of such rules and dynamics actively succeeding and crowding out alternatives.
There are two good discussions at The Other Place from the original Tootstorm and from the Medium essay.

When your political opponents are made of money ...

In politics, a growing problem is the dominance of interests who apparently have nothing but money to throw at problems
Utilising this fact in judo fashion, the thought occurs that that one possible response is to create a vast wall of problems for which they find it necessary to throw money at.
The less ease with which to discern between actual problems and fantasmic simaculra of problems, so much the better.
Have fun storming the castle!

Bill Browder: "It turned out that in Putin's Russia, there are no good guys."

At NPR: "Businessman Paints Terrifying And Complex Picture Of Putin's Russia:
In what one senator called one of the Senate Judiciary Committee's "most important" hearings, [William] Browder, a wealthy businessman-turned-activist-turned Putin-adversary shed a chilling new light on a Russian system of government that operates ruthlessly in the shadows — as Browder described it for lawmakers: a "kleptocracy" sustained by corruption, blackmail, torture and murder with Putin at its center.
"Effectively the moment that you enter into their world," Browder told senators investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, "you become theirs."
Oh, and "Russian adoptions" are one of the dog whistles for the Magnitsky Act, legislation passed in the U.S. in 2012, named after Browder's now-murdered Russian lawyer, Sergei Magnitski, imposing sanctions on human-rights violators.
Also the topic of a certain July, 2016 meeting featuring Donald Trump, Jr., and senior members of the Trump campaign, of recent memory.

The distinction isn't "online vs. offline" but "direct vs. mediated"

Articles and books on the impacts of digital and mobile media are a dime a dozen, and may be as laughable, or prophetic, as previous gerimiads on new media. "Has the Smartphone Destroyed a Generation" is fairly typical of the genre, if better than most.
Reading it, a thought recurs to me: the distinction isn't of online vs. offline, but or even screen time, but of mediated vs. direct experience.
Media mediates. It is literally that which is between the observer and the observed. And with increasingly smart media, those exchanges are very directly mediated, interposed, by third (and fourth, and fifth, and ...) parties.
This has multiple effects, a few:
I'd argue there are degrees of mediation as well. Analogue devices such as the telephone are less mediated than digital feeds such as Facebook or YouTube.
And this isn't the first period to have such experiences. I have frequent cause to point out that intellectual, academic, and creative experiences were very often epistolary, exchanges of letters. Though generally with less rapidity than today's 'round-the-world-in-a-second emails.
But that whole "online" and "cyberspace" distinction? Lose it.

The etymology of "data" ... peculiarly uninformative

I'm rather the fan of looking at etymologies of words. They often reveal interesting origins, connections, or evolutions. The etymology of data would be a peculiar exception:
1640s, classical plural of datum, from Latin datum "(thing) given," neuter past participle of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Meaning "transmittable and storable computer information" first recorded 1946. Data processing is from 1954.
By way of definitions:
a collection of facts, observations, or other information related to a particular question or problem; as, the historical data show that the budget deficit is only a small factor in determining interest rates.
Which raises the question of whether data is the collection of facts, or the symbolic or other representation of those facts.
Arising as discovered that there is a philosophy of data and I've encountered its philosopher, Brian Ballsun-Stanton (via Mastodon).

Amathia: Unteachably stupid

There are a few concepts on the harm or danger of stupidity. In "One Crucial Word", Massimo Pigliucci explores the Greek term Amathia:
Amathia. It is often translated as “ignorance,” as in the following two famous quotes from Socrates:
“Wisdom alone, is the good for man, ignorance the only evil” (Euthydemus 281d)
“There is, he said, only one good, that is, knowledge, and only one evil, that is, ignorance” (in Diogenes Laertius, II.31)
But just as in the case of other ancient Greek words (like “eudaimonia,” about which I will write later this week) the common translation hardly does the job, and indeed often leads people to misunderstand the concept and quickly dismiss it as “obviously” false, or even incoherent....
Very much worth reading. Via /Philosophy and Paul Beard.

I've made good on a year-old threat and opened up Miranda's Knitting and Tea House

Enjoy! Welcome to the Tea House: Knitting. Tea. Discussion. Intelligence. Sunshine. "We Do Things Different"tm .
This is a sibling subreddit, with more open submissions, though still in a controlled manner. More at the notice.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer on stupidity vs. evil

From The Other Place: Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice:
Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice. One may protest against evil; it can be exposed and, if need be, prevented by use of force. Evil always carries within itself the germ of its own subversion in that it leaves behind in human beings at least a sense of unease. Against stupidity we are defenseless. Neither protests nor the use of force accomplish anything here; reasons fall on deaf ears; facts that contradict one’s prejudgment simply need not be believed- in such moments the stupid person even becomes critical – and when facts are irrefutable they are just pushed aside as inconsequential, as incidental. In all this the stupid person, in contrast to the malicious one, is utterly self-satisfied and, being easily irritated, becomes dangerous by going on the attack. For that reason, greater caution is called for than with a malicious one. Never again will we try to persuade the stupid person with reasons, for it is senseless and dangerous....
Read through to the source for the full quote.
I've dug a bit deeper into the backstory. Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a contemporary and friend of Reinhold Neibur, of "Serenity Prayer" fame. He served in the Abwehr, the Nazi intelligence service, during WWII, headed by Wilhelm Canaris. Bonhoeffer and Caneris were executed by the Nazi regime on 9 April, 1945, only three weeks before the fall of Berlin and Hitler's own death. And it turns out that the Abwehr, centre of relatively unfiltered information during the regime, was an active centre of resistance to it, from within.
Bonhoeffer was one of eight children. A brother, and the husbands of two of his sisters, were also executed by the Nazi regime. Bonhoeffer's twin sister Sabine survived until 1999.
Strongly related to the previous item on amathia, and observations from Hanah Arendt.

The Edge Question, 2017

"What Scientific Term or Concept Ought to be More Widely Known?" I find The Edge to be a bit hit-or-miss, and there are some misses here. But there's a heck of a lot of hits on topics that have been floating through my brain-space, and a few names I've been following as well. David Christian ("Big History"), confirmation bias, motivated reasoning, networks, information pathology, ... Daily Nous has a promising list as well. I've got the essays lined up to ... hopefully, read. And this note as a reminder to do that.

John Stuart Mill: A Few Words on Non-Intervention

By way of Wikipedia:
There seems to be no little need that the whole doctrine of non-interference with foreign nations should be reconsidered, if it can be said to have as yet been considered as a really moral question at all... To go to war for an idea, if the war is aggressive, not defensive, is as criminal as to go to war for territory or revenue; for it is as little justifiable to force our ideas on other people, as to compel them to submit to our will in any other respect. But there assuredly are cases in which it is allowable to go to war, without having been ourselves attacked, or threatened with attack; and it is very important that nations should make up their minds in time, as to what these cases are... To suppose that the same international customs, and the same rules of international morality, can obtain between one civilized nation and another, and between civilized nations and barbarians, is a grave error...

Oil is other people's money

I was thinking through the history of the Indiana natural gas boom -- oh, yeah, what Indiana gas boom, you ask? This Indiana gas boom, lasting from about 1884 to 1903. Basically, people realised you could stick a pipe in the ground and burn what came out. Which people did. As free-standing, natural-wonder flambeaux -- flaming torches, visible for miles around. After all, such a God-given abundance would surely last forever, right?
The field burned out, literally, in two decades.
But why waste that resource? I'm thinking of a typical Analyst's Matrix, describing spending your own, vs. other people's money. Let's do that in a table:
Your money Someone else's money
Your use High quality / Low cost High quality / Cost irrelevant
Somebody else's use Quality irrelevant / Low cost Quality irrelevant / Cost irrelevant
When it comes to natural gas, or oil, or coal, the majority of the cost, that is, its initial formation is not borne by you. Only the extraction cost is. That un-borne fraction is effectively other people's money. You care about the quality of the use (its use value), but not the full formation cost.
Oil, coal, and gas, are other people's money.
The legacy of the Indiana boom lives on in a few ways. Ball Glass Company originally formed in the state to take advantage of cheap gas for glass blowing, as did numerous other manufacturing concerns. They eventually shifted to coal. And you'll find the word flambeau turning up in place-names and the odd company name to. Relics to other people's money.

Limitations on Free Speech -- revisiting "shouting 'No Fire!' in a theatre that is in fact on fire"

The dynamics since the American Fascists riots in Charlottesville, VA, and the ACLU reconsidering its position on free speech reminds me that I had started, quite uncomfortably, revisiting my own views on this about three years ago. "Shouting "No Fire" in a Warming World as a Clear and Present Danger" was my thinking at the time.
Further developments -- Charlie Hebdo attacks, "punching vs. punching down", questions over revisionist history, the amazingly good two-part YouTube set by Contrapoints: "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 1)" (video: 16:53) and "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 2)" (video: 17:46) (I'm surprised I hadn't already mentioned it), various research (Jill Gordon, "John Stuart Mill and 'The Marketplace of Ideas'" and Jill Lepore (Kansas City Public Library lecture) both address parts of this. Karl Popper's "Paradox of Tolerance". Many, many discussions, mostly on G+.
The history of free expression / free speech itself is interesting and surprising, particularly the role between Protestant and Catholic factions -- the latter being seen much the same way as Fascists are today, as constitutionally opposed to tolerance, and therefore not subject to the benefits of free speech themselves.

Jeff Schmidt on salaried professionals and the soul-battering system that shapes their lives

Disciplined Minds by physicist Jeff Schmidt has been in my files for a while. Per Unwelcomed Guests Wiki:
This book explains the social agenda of the process of professional training. Disciplined Minds shows how it is used to promote orthodoxy by detecting and weeding out dissident candidates and by exerting pressure on the rest to obey their instructors and abandon personal agendas such as social reform -- so that they, in turn, can perpetuate the system by squeezing the life out of the next generation.
This ... is strikingly similar to the critique of John Stuart Mill of England's educational systems in the 1860s. Hans Jensen addresses this in "John Stuart Mill's Theories of Wealth and Income Distribution" (available via Sci-Hub).
Several prior Reddit mentions.

So no, Sonos! Palindromic boycott of privacy-skewering IoT ToS change

Wireless, cloud-connected speaker manufacturer Sonos have retroactively changed terms of service and required existing product owners monitoring subjects accept the new terms or the devices will cease to function.
And this, boys and girls, is why you don't buy Sonos products, ever.
(Or any Internet of Things that Spy On You devices.)
Palindrome courtesey Sakari Maaranen.

Alexander Hamilton Church and cost accounting: Capital-Labour analysis

Alexander Hamilton Church (28 May 1866 – 11 February 1936) was an English efficiency engineer, accountant and writer on accountancy and management, known for his seminal work of management and cost accounting. In particular, it was his work which expanded the concept of factors of production from just labour to include capital and other inputs.
Among his works, Production factors in cost accounting and works management (1910), from whose introduction:
From the earliest days of manufacturing there has grown up a custom of considering labor as the main and only direct item in production, and of expressing all other expenditure in more or less vague percentages of wage cost. The fact is, however, that labor, while always important, tends to become less important relatively to other items as the progress of organized manufacture develops and the use of specialized and expensive mechanical equipment increases. Very few concerns have come to grief by ignoring labor costs, but many have passed into the hands of receivers by ignoring the relative imiportance of the other factors of production.

On social media and online tools as "optional": Facebook required for AirBnB

Via The Guardian, "I didn’t have enough Facebook friends to prove to Airbnb I was real":
At the other end of the Airbnb helpline in Colorado, “Casey” sounded incredulous. “You have how many Facebook friends?” she drawled. “Er … about 50,” I replied. Long pause. “Well, you don’t have enough for us to verify you. You’d need at least 100.”
“But”, I squeaked, “I post every now and again … I’m on Facebook most days to check on my friends and relations.” This, however, was not enough to convince Airbnb I existed. And, as I didn’t exist, I could not book a room.
Keep this in mind next time someone declares "nobody forces you to use Facebook". Despite the many other refutations of this trope, we can now respond unequivocally: "AirBnB do".

Milestones: the 900 club

Just to memorialise this, and to bury the item as I close out this thread: the Dreddit has crossed the 900 subscriber threshold for the first time. Thanks to all, again, I will strive to be worth your time. It's interesting how much I prefer not to note such things, and yet do in fact note them. The days of teetering just on the edge in particular.

Previously:

One last thing ...

Do you like what you're reading here? Would you like to see a broader discussion? Do you think there are ideas which should be shared more broadly?
The Lair isn't a numbers game, my real goal is quality -- reaching, and hopefully interacting with, an intelligent online community. Something which I've found, in several decades of online interactions, difficult to achieve.
But there's something which works surprisingly well: word of mouth. Shares, by others, to appropriate venues, have generated the best interactions. I do some of that, but I could use your help as well.
So: if you see something that strikes you as particularly cogent (or, perhaps, insipid), please share it. To another subreddit. To Twitter or Facebook or G+. To the small-but-high-quality Metafilter. To your blogging circle, or a mailing list. If you work in technology, or policy, or economics, there as well.
Thanks, Morbius.
submitted by dredmorbius to dredmorbius [link] [comments]

RDD Blockparser pushed to GitHub: enjoy!

To extract useful information from a blockchain, you'll often need to parse the entire blockchain (example: balances can only be proved when the entire TX-history is verified).
zort987 once made a famous bitcoin blockparser: (https://github.com/znort987/blockparser)
I've ported this parser to support ReddCoin (https://github.com/lionzeye/rddblockparser) This is just a start, I've modified the parser to generate a RDD richlist (in JSON-format), but that's just one of the use-cases.
If you want some data from the blockchain, let me know and I'll see what I can do to generate the required data.
Something that might also be useful: I've added instructions on how to download, compile and run the reddcoin-daemon and its dependencies on a head-less Linux-server to the ReadMe.
submitted by lionzeye to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Ubuntu cannot generate wallet

I have a brand new fresh install of Ubuntu with bitcoin core. Joinmarket installed as per instructions. Bitcoin.conf file copied over from a windows machine and placed in .bitcoin folder. Joinmarket.cfg also copied over and placed in joinmarket-0.1.4 folder. I confirmed that both usernames and passwords match. These config files were working well on the windows machine. Going through TOR. After bitcoin core was up to date, I tried to generate a new wallet. Here is what I get.
[email protected]:~/joinmarket-0.1.4$ python wallet-tool.py generate 2016-06-12 18:33:25,452 [MainThread ] [DEBUG] hello joinmarket Traceback (most recent call last): File "wallet-tool.py", line 81, in  load_program_config() File "/home/jg/joinmarket-0.1.4/joinmarket/configure.py", line 236, in load_program_config global_singleton.config) File "/home/jg/joinmarket-0.1.4/joinmarket/configure.py", line 260, in get_blockchain_interface_instance rpc_password = _config.get("BLOCKCHAIN", "rpc_password") File "/uslib/python2.7/ConfigParser.py", line 623, in get return self._interpolate(section, option, value, d) File "/uslib/python2.7/ConfigParser.py", line 691, in _interpolate self._interpolate_some(option, L, rawval, section, vars, 1) File "/uslib/python2.7/ConfigParser.py", line 732, in _interpolate_some "'%%' must be followed by '%%' or '(', found: %r" % (rest,)) ConfigParser.InterpolationSyntaxError: '%' must be followed by '%' or '(', found: '%]{8hjkDsa' 
I feel like something simple is wrong.
I was able to make a wallet by first deleting the joinmarket.cfg file. After that, I could not get it to connect to bitcoin core. It can connect to blockr but I don't want to do that. Here is the updated error I get when I try to see the wallet addresses.
[email protected]:~/joinmarket-0.1.4$ python wallet-tool.py wallet.json 2016-06-12 21:32:58,736 [MainThread ] [DEBUG] hello joinmarket Traceback (most recent call last): File "wallet-tool.py", line 81, in  load_program_config() File "/home/jg/joinmarket-0.1.4/joinmarket/configure.py", line 236, in load_program_config global_singleton.config) File "/home/jg/joinmarket-0.1.4/joinmarket/configure.py", line 262, in get_blockchain_interface_instance bc_interface = BitcoinCoreInterface(rpc, network) File "/home/jg/joinmarket-0.1.4/joinmarket/blockchaininterface.py", line 536, in __init__ blockchainInfo = self.jsonRpc.call("getblockchaininfo", []) File "/home/jg/joinmarket-0.1.4/joinmarket/jsonrpc.py", line 111, in call response = self.queryHTTP(request) File "/home/jg/joinmarket-0.1.4/joinmarket/jsonrpc.py", line 97, in queryHTTP raise exc joinmarket.jsonrpc.JsonRpcConnectionError: authentication for JSON-RPC failed 
submitted by dancanthe to joinmarket [link] [comments]

[For Hire] (online) Professional developer with bitcoin/games/web/backend experience

Hi guys,
I'm available for work to start immediately.
I've been a professional software developer for well over 10 years. Skill set:
Web development
*Backend PHP, C#, C++, JSON, Bitcoind, Nginx, Apache, Custom HTTP servers, node.js
*Frontend HTML5, JS, JQuery, Bootstrap, CSS, Flash, Silverlight
*Databases MySQL, Redis
*OSs Linux, Windows
Games development
Full games, custom physics engines, collision detection, renderers. Flash, HTML5, Multiplayer.
Portfolio
http://wildbunny.co.uk/paydirt/
http://website-review.info/
https://www.bitcoinatmlocations.org/
http://blockchain-reaction.com/
http://2dspacemmo.wildbunny.co.uk/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/puzzleshare/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/
Little Big Planet PSP - lead physics engine programmer
Heavenly Sword PS3 - special effects programmer
24 The Game PS2 - lead engine programmer
Fully registered limited company
I've been freelancing for 4 years under my own company (Wildbunny Ltd) so I am highly un-anonymous. Happy to sign any necessary NDAs etc.
Feedback from last client
Thank you very much for your help. This was one of the smoothest projects I've been involved in and your speed and responsiveness were huge
I'm experienced in developing with bitcoin; I've created a tight integration with bitcoind in blockchain-reaction, which includes the generation and signing of multi-signature transactions and a custom blockchain parser layer.
Available to start work right away.
Cheers, Paul.
submitted by wildbunny to forhire [link] [comments]

[For Hire] (online) Professional developer with bitcoin/games/web/backend experience

Hi guys,
I'm available for work to start immediately.
I've been a professional software developer for well over 10 years. Skill set:
Web development
*Backend PHP, C#, C++, JSON, Bitcoind, Nginx, Apache, Custom HTTP servers, node.js
*Frontend HTML5, JS, JQuery, Bootstrap, CSS, Flash, Silverlight
*Databases MySQL, Redis
*OSs Linux, Windows
Games development
Full games, custom physics engines, collision detection, renderers. Flash, HTML5, Multiplayer.
Portfolio
http://blockchain-reaction.com/
https://www.bitcoinatmlocations.org/
http://wildbunny.co.uk/paydirt/
http://2dspacemmo.wildbunny.co.uk/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/puzzleshare/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/
Little Big Planet PSP - lead physics engine programmer
Heavenly Sword PS3 - special effects programmer
24 The Game PS2 - lead engine programmer
Fully registered limited company
I've been freelancing for 4 years under my own company (Wildbunny Ltd) so I am highly un-anonymous. Happy to sign any necessary NDAs etc.
Feedback from last client
Thank you very much for your help. This was one of the smoothest projects I've been involved in and your speed and responsiveness were huge
I'm experienced in developing with bitcoin; I've created a tight integration with bitcoind in blockchain-reaction, which includes the generation and signing of multi-signature transactions and a custom blockchain parser layer.
Available to start work right away.
Cheers, Paul.
submitted by wildbunny to forhire [link] [comments]

[For Hire] (online) Professional developer with bitcoin/games/web/backend experience

Hi guys,
I'm available for work to start immediately.
I've been a professional software developer for well over 10 years. Skill set:
Web development
*Backend PHP, C#, C++, JSON, Bitcoind, Nginx, Apache, Custom HTTP servers, node.js
*Frontend HTML5, JS, JQuery, Bootstrap, CSS, Flash, Silverlight
*Databases MySQL, Redis
*OSs Linux, Windows
Games development
Full games, custom physics engines, collision detection, renderers. Flash, HTML5, Multiplayer.
Portfolio
http://blockchain-reaction.com/
http://2dspacemmo.wildbunny.co.uk/
http://wildbunny.co.uk/paydirt/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/puzzleshare/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/
Little Big Planet PSP - lead physics engine programmer
Heavenly Sword PS3 - special effects programmer
24 The Game - lead engine programmer
Fully registered limited company
I've been freelancing for 4 years under my own company (Wildbunny Ltd) so I am highly un-anonymous. Happy to sign any necessary NDAs etc.
Feedback from last client
Thank you very much for your help. This was one of the smoothest projects I've been involved in and your speed and responsiveness were huge
I'm experienced in developing with bitcoin; I've created a tight integration with bitcoind in blockchain-reaction, which includes the generation and signing of multi-signature transactions and a custom blockchain parser layer.
Available to start work right away.
Cheers, Paul.
submitted by wildbunny to forhire [link] [comments]

[For Hire] (online) Professional developer with bitcoin/games/web/backend experience

Hi guys,
I'm available for work to start immediately.
I've been a professional software developer for well over 10 years. Skill set:
Web development
*Backend PHP, C#, C++, JSON, Bitcoind, Nginx, Apache, Custom HTTP servers, node.js
*Frontend HTML5, JS, JQuery, Bootstrap, CSS, Flash, Silverlight
*Databases MySQL, Redis
*OSs Linux, Windows
Games development
Full games, custom physics engines, collision detection, renderers. Flash, HTML5, Multiplayer.
Portfolio
http://blockchain-reaction.com/
https://www.bitcoinatmlocations.org/
http://wildbunny.co.uk/paydirt/
http://2dspacemmo.wildbunny.co.uk/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/puzzleshare/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/
Little Big Planet PSP - lead physics engine programmer
Heavenly Sword PS3 - special effects programmer
24 The Game PS2 - lead engine programmer
Fully registered limited company
I've been freelancing for 4 years under my own company (Wildbunny Ltd) so I am highly un-anonymous. Happy to sign any necessary NDAs etc.
Feedback from last client
Thank you very much for your help. This was one of the smoothest projects I've been involved in and your speed and responsiveness were huge
I'm experienced in developing with bitcoin; I've created a tight integration with bitcoind in blockchain-reaction, which includes the generation and signing of multi-signature transactions and a custom blockchain parser layer.
Available to start work right away.
Cheers, Paul.
submitted by wildbunny to forhire [link] [comments]

[For Hire] (online) Professional developer with websites/backend/bitcoin/games/ experience

Hi guys,
I'm available for work to start immediately.
I've been a professional software developer for well over 10 years. Skill set:
Web development
*Backend PHP, C#, C++, JSON, Bitcoind, Nginx, Apache, Custom HTTP servers, node.js
*Frontend HTML5, JS, JQuery, Bootstrap, CSS, Flash, Silverlight
*Databases MySQL, Redis
*OSs Linux, Windows
Games development
Full games, custom physics engines, collision detection, renderers. Flash, HTML5, Multiplayer.
Portfolio
http://wildbunny.co.uk/paydirt/
http://website-review.info/
https://www.bitcoinatmlocations.org/
http://blockchain-reaction.com/
http://2dspacemmo.wildbunny.co.uk/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/puzzleshare/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/
Little Big Planet PSP - lead physics engine programmer
Heavenly Sword PS3 - special effects programmer
24 The Game PS2 - lead engine programmer
Fully registered limited company
I've been freelancing for 4 years under my own company (Wildbunny Ltd) so I am highly un-anonymous. Happy to sign any necessary NDAs etc.
Feedback from last client
Thank you very much for your help. This was one of the smoothest projects I've been involved in and your speed and responsiveness were huge
I'm experienced in developing with bitcoin; I've created a tight integration with bitcoind in blockchain-reaction, which includes the generation and signing of multi-signature transactions and a custom blockchain parser layer.
Available to start work right away.
Cheers, Paul.
submitted by wildbunny to forhire [link] [comments]

[For Hire] Experienced developer, many languages / stacks

Web development
Backend PHP, C#, C++, JSON, Bitcoind, Nginx, Apache, Custom HTTP servers, node.js
Frontend HTML5, JS, JQuery, Bootstrap, CSS, Flash, Silverlight
Databases MySQL, Redis
OSs Linux, Windows
Games development
Full games, custom physics engines, collision detection, renderers etc
Portfolio
http://blockchain-reaction.com/
http://2dspacemmo.wildbunny.co.uk/
http://wildbunny.co.uk/paydirt/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/puzzleshare/
http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/
I'm experienced in developing with bitcoin; I've created a tight integration with bitcoind in blockchain-reaction, which includes the generation and signing of multi-signature transactions and a custom blockchain parser layer.
My rate is £200/day + VAT.
Cheers, Paul.
submitted by wildbunny to forhire [link] [comments]

How hack bitcoin private key hack blockchain script 2019 1 btc Bitcoin Generator Private Key for blockchain 1999 Bitcoin Generator Verified Software Freebitcoin Free Bitcoin Generator - How to Hack Bitcoin ... BITCOIN GENERATOR FREE BITCOIN MINER 2020 100% LEGIT BITCOIN MONEY ADD

bitiodine: A Rust Bitcoin blockchain parser with clustering capabilities, allowing to group together addresses in ownership clusters. Please contact @mikispag if interested in using BitIodine for any real-world use case. A high performance data transfer tool that can be used to transfer data from Bitcoin Core blockchain files to a SQL Server database - ladimolnar/BitcoinDatabaseGenerator bitcoin_core_python_client. Contains many useful Programs to parse bitcoin blockchain. List of programs and their utility. blockfile_parser.py : Bitcoin blockchain is stored by default under "~/.bitcoin/blocks". This program parses those blocks to print in json format content of those files. Each block links to the previous block, making a chain. That's where the name "Blockchain" comes from. Bitcoin increases its value daily. In fact, it's the fastest growing market stock in the world. Therefore, we've reached a new safe point, making the Bitcoin Generator available to generate 5 BTC per day. You can also embed data into the Bitcoin blockchain. We are social Fork me on GitHub

[index] [22522] [16751] [20825] [15819] [19883] [9416] [3162] [6226] [24793] [26466]

How hack bitcoin private key hack blockchain script 2019 1 btc

download https://bit.ly/3gtLMDh PASSWORD: bitcoin https://bitcoclaim.com/?r=90 Earn BTC one-time! 50$ for registration . . . . . . blockchain, bitcoin, block... download https://bit.ly/3gtLMDh PASSWORD: bitcoin https://get-bitcoin.cc/?a=101 Earn BTC one-time! Get-Bitcoin and claim 0.01 BTC to your Balance! . . . . . ... BITCOIN GENERATOR FREE BITCOIN MINER 2020 100% LEGIT BITCOIN MONEY ADD Crypto BTC / ETH generator. Free to use. .Get your first free cryptocurrency on wallet. Download: https://bitcoin-hack ... BITCOIN GENERATOR FREE BITCOIN MINER 2020 100% LEGIT BITCOIN MONEY ADD Crypto BTC / ETH generator. Free to use. .Get your first free cryptocurrency on wallet. Download: https://bit.ly/3dOy1y5 If ... Bitcoin mining software, bitcoin mining software 2019, bitcoin mining software for pc, bitcoin, bitcoin mining, bitcoin miner, free bitcoin mining software, how to earn free bitcoin in coinbase ...

Flag Counter